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Latest Aviation medicine Stories

2009-07-01 12:00:00

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Two flight surgeons supporting Wyle and its NASA Bioastronautics Contract have been selected for the next astronaut class. NASA announced last week that Dr. Kjell Lindgren and Dr. Serena Aunon, both assistant professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, are among nine new astronauts selected from a pool of 3,565 applicants. UTMB is one of Wyle's major subcontractors on its...

2009-06-29 16:31:52

Exercise requires the integrated activity of every organ and tissue in the body, and understanding how these respond to the decreased oxygen levels present at moderate to high altitude is the focus of the current special issue of High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com). The entire issue is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/ham Guest Editor Peter D. Wagner, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine &...

2009-05-05 08:02:43

Obstructive sleep apnea, or periodic interruptions in breathing throughout the night, thickens sufferers' blood vessels.  Moreover, it increases the risk of several forms of heart and vascular disease. Emory researchers have identified the enzyme NADPH oxidase as important for the effects obstructive sleep apnea has on blood vessels in the lung. The results are published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. C. Michael Hart, professor of...

2009-03-27 22:20:00

Dr. Earl Wood, inventor of the high-altitude pressure suit worn by pilots and astronauts, has died in Rochester, Minn. He was 97. The Mayo Clinic, where Woods was a researcher, said Wood -- who died March 18 -- was an integral part of the team that developed the first civilian human centrifuge in the United States. The centrifuge was used to test human reactions to high levels of gravitational forces. In large part, their work laid the foundation for the science behind modern aerospace...

2009-03-27 10:25:00

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla., March 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Caroline Brozovich's fingers and lips have turned blue-grey, her movements are sluggish, and her eyes half-shut, as though she's peering through a fog. The oxygen around her is now as thin as the air at 30,000 feet, the cruising altitude for jet aircraft. If Brozovich were piloting an airliner, she and her passengers would be minutes away from unconsciousness - and death. But Brozovich is a flight student at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical...

2008-11-05 09:00:34

HOBOKEN, N.J., Nov. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study published in the journal of Minerva Cardioangiologica reveals Pycnogenol(R), pine bark extract from the French maritime pine tree, reduces jetlag in passengers by nearly 50 percent. The two-part study, consisting of a brain CT scan and a scoring system, showed Pycnogenol(R) lowered symptoms of jetlag such as fatigue, headaches, insomnia and brain edema (swelling) in both healthy individuals and hypertensive patients. Passengers also...

2008-09-09 00:00:19

By AJ Panian An elderly Pittsburgh man killed in a plane crash in Westmoreland County did not have the federally required medical certification needed to fly a plane, according to licensing records. The man's cardiologist said his patient had suffered a "silent heart attack," and that had he known he was a pilot, he would have advised him not to fly. John H. "Jack" Haber, 78, was killed Aug. 31 when the Cessna T310R turbo engine plane he was flying solo crashed about 9:45 a.m. in a...

2008-07-02 00:00:28

By The Associated Press FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) - A fiery collision that killed six people aboard two medical helicopters has underscored the dangers of emergency flights and renewed questions about whether they are worth the risks. Experts agree air ambulances can save lives when the victim is in grave condition and the hospital is a long way off or hard to reach by road. But they say there are other cases in which an ordinary ground ambulance is just as good, and perhaps safer. The...

2008-06-16 06:00:37

By Dariush Shafa, Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro, Ky. Jun. 16--Residents of Owensboro and surrounding counties have a new friend in the skies. On June 9, PHI Air Medical began operating a new medflight helicopter based at the Muhlenberg County Airport. So far, they've made three runs and had calls for four others that they were unable to take because of weather, distance or the time it would take to get to the call area. The new base in Greenville is the sixth such PHI base in...

2008-05-01 16:50:04

The Allied airmen and women of World War II were certainly brave and skilled in battle, but even they couldn't win the war on their own. Plagued in the early, low-tech years of the war by dangerous afflictions such as altitude and decompression sickness, pilots got some help behind the front lines from a team of American physiologists who studied the effects on the body of flying. Their research, which involved at least one parachuting dog, and the technology it initiated...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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