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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 5:23 EDT

Latest Axon guidance Stories

2012-05-24 21:13:07

A molecule responsible for the proper formation of a key portion of the nervous system finds its way to the proper place not because it is actively recruited, but instead because it can't go anywhere else. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have identified a distal axonal cytoskeleton as the boundary that makes sure AnkyrinG clusters where it needs to so it can perform properly. "It has been known that AnkyrinG is needed for the axon initial segment to form. Without the axon...

2012-02-21 06:06:12

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Recent research has shown that Alzheimer's drugs, which are in clinical trials still, have adverse side effects. The drugs are designed to prevent BACE1, the enzyme Robert Vassar originally discovered that promotes the development of clumps of plaque associated with Alzheimer's.  BACE1 cuts up and releases proteins that form the plaque, making those who developed the drug believe that by blocking the enzyme the development of Alzheimer's disease might slow down....

2012-02-20 12:56:23

Drugs may act like bad electrician, messing up wiring in brain and nervous system Alzheimer's disease drugs now being tested in clinical trials may have potentially adverse side effects, according to new Northwestern Medicine research. A study with mice suggests the drugs could act like a bad electrician, causing neurons to be miswired and interfering with their ability to send messages to the brain. The findings, from the scientist whose original research led to the drug development,...

2011-09-21 20:47:44

Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have identified more than 70 genes that play a role in regenerating nerves after injury, providing biomedical researchers with a valuable set of genetic leads for use in developing therapies to repair spinal cord injuries and other common kinds of nerve damage such as stroke. In the September 22 issue of the journal Neuron, the scientists detail their discoveries after an exhaustive two-year investigation of 654 genes suspected to be...

2011-01-19 14:09:55

Mutant presenilin is infamous for its role in the most aggressive form of Alzheimer's disease"”early-onset familial Alzheimer's"”which can strike people as early as their 30s. In their latest study, researchers at the Salk Institute uncovered presenilin's productive side: It helps embryonic motor neurons navigate the maze of chemical cues that pull, push and hem them in on their way to their proper targets. Without it, budding motor neurons misread their guidance signals and get...

2011-01-07 11:02:24

Work published today shows that brain cells need to create links early on in their existence, when they are physically close together, to ensure successful connections across the brain throughout life. In people, these long-distance connections enable the left and right side of the brain to communicate and integrate different kinds of information such as sound and vision. A change in the number of these connections has been found in many developmental brain disorders including autism,...

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2010-11-18 10:49:42

By Laurie Moore, University of Southern California USC College's Samantha Butler and collaborators show that the rate and direction of axon growth in the spinal cord can be controlled, a discovery that one day may help improve treatment for spinal injuries or neurodegenerative diseases. Both the rate and direction of axon growth in the spinal cord can be controlled, according to new research by USC College's Samantha Butler and her collaborators. The study, "The Bone Morphogenetic Protein...

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2010-01-10 14:03:33

Tuberous sclerosis, commonly associated with autism, is linked to defects in axon guidance Studying a rare disorder known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), researchers at Children's Hospital Boston add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that autism spectrum disorders, which affect 25 to 50 percent of TSC patients, result from a miswiring of connections in the developing brain, leading to improper information flow. The finding may also help explain why many people with TSC have...

2009-08-04 07:55:03

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated the ability to correctly re-wire connections to the spinal cord after spinal cord injury. Sensory systems of the body send axons "“ long, slender projections of the neuron that function as wires "“ into the spinal cord to convey information regarding touch, position, and pain. Many sensory axons are covered by an insulating myelin sheath, which helps these impulses travel efficiently to the...

2009-05-16 09:35:25

The research group of Dr. Fr©d©ric Charron, a researcher at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montr©al (IRCM), has made a discovery which could help treat spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This new finding has been published in the current issue of the prestigious scientific journal Neuron. Patricia T. Yam, S©bastien D. Langlois and Steves Morin, all at the IRCM, are listed as co-authors.The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons....