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2012-01-12 21:10:20

For years, researchers seeking new therapies for traumatic brain injury have been tantalized by the results of animal experiments with stem cells. In numerous studies, stem cell implantation has substantially improved brain function in experimental animals with brain trauma. But just how these improvements occur has remained a mystery. Now, an important part of this puzzle has been pieced together by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. In experiments with...

2012-01-11 06:35:56

(Ivanhoe Newswire)-- Recent studies give hope for patients with the irreversible disease known as MS or multiple sclerosis by possibly reversing the aging effects of the central nervous system. Approximately 100,000 people in the United Kingdom, 400,000 in the United States and several million worldwide are affected by MS. With age our bodies' regenerative abilities decrease. While wrinkles allow us to see visible aging effects of skin many other body tissues are left invisibly aging....

2012-01-09 17:23:08

In a new study on fruit flies, the nanoparticles do not harm cells or interfere with the brain's normal function In the images of fruit flies, clusters of neurons are all lit up, forming a brightly glowing network of highways within the brain. It's exactly what University at Buffalo researcher Shermali Gunawardena was hoping to see: It meant that ORMOSIL, a novel class of nanoparticles, had successfully penetrated the insects' brains. And even after long-term exposure, the cells and the...

2012-01-06 15:13:06

Proof of principle study suggests the age-associated decline of the remyelination process is reversible New research highlights the possibility of reversing ageing in the central nervous system for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The study is published today, 06 January, in the journal Cell Stem Cell. As we get older, our bodies' ability to regenerate decreases. This is not only true for our skin (which is evident in the wrinkles that develop as we age) but also true for other tissues...

2012-01-06 15:11:48

Proof-of-principle study provides hope for stimulating remyelination Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard University, and the University of Cambridge have found that the age-related impairment of the body's ability to replace protective myelin sheaths, which normally surround nerve fibers and allow them to send signals properly, may be reversible, offering new hope that therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring efficient regeneration can be effective in the central nervous system...

2011-12-22 11:00:00

System Will Make Educational Content and Online Testing More Accessible to Athletes and Their Families to Help Qualified Medical Providers Make Return-to-Play Decisions After Head Injuries Saratoga Springs, NY (PRWEB) December 22, 2011 SportsSignup, a national leader in online services for sports organizations, and Axon Sports, creators of a breakthrough testing system that helps qualified medical providers make return-to-play decisions after head injuries, are collaborating on educational...

2011-09-21 20:47:44

Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have identified more than 70 genes that play a role in regenerating nerves after injury, providing biomedical researchers with a valuable set of genetic leads for use in developing therapies to repair spinal cord injuries and other common kinds of nerve damage such as stroke. In the September 22 issue of the journal Neuron, the scientists detail their discoveries after an exhaustive two-year investigation of 654 genes suspected to be...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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