Quantcast

Latest Baby talk Stories

Long Before Their First Words, Babies' Brains Rehearse Speech Mechanics
2014-07-15 03:33:45

Molly McElroy, University of Washington Infants can tell the difference between sounds of all languages until about 8 months of age when their brains start to focus only on the sounds they hear around them. It's been unclear how this transition occurs, but social interactions and caregivers' use of exaggerated "parentese" style of speech seem to help. University of Washington research in 7- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate...

2014-02-14 11:07:24

Fifty years of research has revealed the sad truth that the children of lower-income, less-educated parents typically enter school with poorer language skills than their more privileged counterparts. By some measures, 5-year-old children of lower socioeconomic status (SES) score two years behind on standardized language development tests by the time they enter school. In recent years, Anne Fernald, a psychology professor at Stanford University, has conducted experiments revealing that the...

2014-01-07 13:43:23

Common advice to new parents is that the more words babies hear the faster their vocabulary grows. Now new findings show that what spurs early language development isn't so much the quantity of words as the style of speech and social context in which speech occurs. Researchers at the University of Washington and University of Connecticut examined thousands of 30-second snippets of verbal exchanges between parents and babies. They measured parents' use of a regular speaking voice versus an...

Infants Can Recognize Emotions In Facial Expressions
2013-06-27 18:43:48

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study published in the journal Infancy shows that babies are able to recognize each other's moods by five months of age. Brigham Young University researchers determined that infants are able to sometimes see what adults can't when looking at their peers. "Newborns can't verbalize to their mom or dad that they are hungry or tired, so the first way they communicate is through affect or emotion," says psychology professor Ross...

2013-04-19 23:01:18

The long-standing theory that words come before music may have finally been debunked. A study has found that music recognition comes first, and is an integral part of word comprehension — a breakthrough finding insofar as the core concepts of vocabulary learning is concerned, says eReflect. New York City, NY (PRWEB) April 20, 2013 A new study conducted by researchers from the Rice University´s Shepherd School of Music and the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), has made...

200352432-001
2012-06-12 14:19:36

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com Scientists reported in the American journal of Primatology that gorillas use a type of "baby talk" when communicating with infants. A team of scientists studied captive western lowland gorillas by watching and filming the animals as they interacted. Western lowland gorillas have a wide range of communication gestures, so the team focused on facial expressions and hand signals used in play. Eva Maria Luef from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary...

2010-03-25 12:21:08

Words influence infants' cognition from first months of life EVANSTON, Ill. -- Northwestern University researchers have found that even before infants begin to speak, words play an important role in their cognition. For 3-month-old infants, words influence performance in a cognitive task in a way that goes beyond the influence of other kinds of sounds, including musical tones. The research by Alissa Ferry, Susan Hespos and Sandra Waxman in the psychology department in the Weinberg College of...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
Related