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Latest Bacteria Stories

2014-05-28 12:42:51

University of Gothenburg A newly discovered tick-borne bacterium known as “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis” has been implicated in six cases of disease in Sweden. A new international study led by the Sahlgrenska Academy has shown that this bacterium is primarily a risk for people who are already sick and who are receiving immunosuppressive drugs. The Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis bacterium, known in the medical world by its short name Neoehrlichia, was discovered and...

2014-05-28 12:23:42

As the dangers of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as MRSA, in addition to others, become more prevalent due to the overzealous use of antibiotics on livestock farms, Clearstream says that antimicrobial technologies and advanced long-term application protocols are part of the solution in containing the spread of viral and bacterial contaminants and protecting the public's health. HARRISBURG, N.C., May 28, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Studies have shown that farmworkers, as well as those...

2014-05-28 08:54:11

ETH Zurich Researchers at ETH Zurich have isolated a protein from a fungus of the spruce which combats nematodes. The scientists hope that toxins of this kind will become the basis for the vaccination of livestock or domestic animals against zooparasitic nematodes. Most terrestrial plants enter into biocoenosis with fungi. Both sides benefit: the fungus, which surrounds the small roots of the host plant with a thick felt, supplies the plant with trace elements and water. The plant, in...

2014-05-27 11:46:17

University of Bristol An international team of scientists has made a major step forward in our understanding of how enzymes 'edit' genes, paving the way for correcting genetic diseases in patients. Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Münster and the Lithuanian Institute of Biotechnology have observed the process by which a class of enzymes called CRISPR – pronounced 'crisper' – bind and alter the structure of DNA. The results, published in the Proceedings of the National...

ditch the soap and water
2014-05-26 04:56:34

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While recent research has concluded that using soap containing antimicrobial ingredients could be doing more harm than good, one New York Times Magazine journalist’s experiments with products that replace traditional cleaning compounds with bacteria treatments have reportedly left her skin softer and smoother than ever before. As she explained in a May 22 article, writer Julie Scott participated in a trial for a living bacterial...

2014-05-22 23:11:52

New research from PathoGenetix, Inc. demonstrates the use of its Genome Sequence Scanning technology to confirm and strain type pathogenic E. coli and Listeria bacteria directly from complex food samples, and to reliably determine if the most dangerous serotypes of these foodborne pathogens are present. The research was presented at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) General Meeting this week in Boston. WOBURN, MASS (PRWEB) May 22, 2014 PathoGenetix™ Inc., a commercial-stage...

2014-05-22 23:04:01

Report Identifies Challenges and Includes Recommendations for Management of Future Meningococcal Disease Outbreaks Bethesda, Maryland (PRWEB) May 22, 2014 An expert panel assembled by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) examined recent meningococcal disease outbreaks on multiple college campuses in the United States and concluded that despite its rarity, the severe nature of meningococcal disease makes advance planning essential. These outbreaks were particularly...

2014-05-22 23:01:18

New St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital-led study reveals differences in the pneumococcal genome that explain why current vaccines aren’t better at protecting children with sickle cell disease from the bacterial infection. Memphis, Tenn. (PRWEB) May 22, 2014 Researchers have identified differences in the genetic code of pneumococcal bacteria that may explain why it poses such a risk to children with sickle cell disease and why current vaccines don’t provide better protection...

2014-05-22 10:34:38

Washington University School of Medicine Drug-resistant bacteria annually sicken 2 million Americans and kill at least 23,000. A driving force behind this growing public health threat is the ability of bacteria to share genes that provide antibiotic resistance. Bacteria that naturally live in the soil have a vast collection of genes to fight off antibiotics, but they are much less likely to share these genes, a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St....

2014-05-21 12:47:00

American Chemical Society For anyone searching for another reason to enjoy a glass of red wine with dinner, here's a good one: A new study has found that red wine, as well as grape seed extract, could potentially help prevent cavities. They say that their report, which appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could lead to the development of natural products that ward off dental diseases with fewer side effects. M. Victoria Moreno-Arribas and colleagues explain that...


Latest Bacteria Reference Libraries

0_ce8c5b23d8785d6957f1484978ad758f
2011-04-28 18:03:11

Yersinia enterocolitica is a species of gram-negative coccobacillus-shaped bacterium, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Infection from Yersinia enterocolitica causes the zoonotic disease yersiniosis. Most infected animals recover from the disease and become asymptomatic carriers. Acute infections lead to mild self-limiting entero-colitis or terminal ileitis in humans. Symptoms include watery or bloody diarrhea and fever. After oral uptake it replicates in the terminal ileum and...

0_cef863082995e6cb66fa4a692bf165a7
2011-04-28 16:37:36

Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved, rod-shaped bacteria of the Vibrio Genus. Hollis et al. first reported it in 1976. It was given the name Beneckea vulnifica by Reichelt et al. in 1976 and in 1979 Vibrio vulnificus by Farmer. V. vulnificus is related to V. cholerae and is present in marine environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas. It causes an infection often incurred after eating seafood, especially raw or undercooked oysters. It can...

0_9fb0173be70876d98667eddc1e274866
2011-04-28 14:27:08

Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus, is Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, bile-soluble aerotolerant, anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. It was recognized as a major cause of pneumonia in the late 19th century and is thus the subject of many humoral immunity studies. It causes many other types of pneumococcal infections other than pneumonia including acute sinusitis, otitis media, meningitis, bacteremia, sepsis, septic arthritis, peritonitis, cellulites, and brain abscess. It...

0_b8b1f3bc239d54bf277f330c7dafdbb1
2011-04-26 23:21:38

Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive cocci, Facultative anaerobic bacterium commonly found in the human oral cavity and is a significant contributor to tooth decay. J Kilian Clarke first described the microbe in 1924. The first colonizers of the tooth surface are mainly Neisseria spp. and streptococci, including S. mutans. The pioneer species changes the local environmental conditions through growth and metabolism thus allowing more fastidious organisms to further colonize after them,...

0_565be8ac4669df235cfa9eb09fa14a3d
2011-04-26 20:59:00

Staphylococcus epidermidis is one of thirty-three known species belonging to the genus Staphylococcus. It is part of our skin flora and can also be found in the mucous membranes and in animals. It is the most common species found in laboratory test due to contamination. It is not usually pathogenic; however, patients with a compromised immune system often risk infection. Infections can be both nosocomial and community acquired and are more of a threat to hospital patients. Hospitals carry...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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