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Latest Bacteriophage Stories

2014-07-15 13:33:52

Emory Health Sciences Bacterial defense system vs phages has unexpected functions CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. The finding contrasts with previous observations in other bacteria that the CRISPR system hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. The results are scheduled for publication in PNAS Early Edition....

human intestinal flora
2014-07-07 04:50:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have discovered 500 previously unidentified microorganisms in human intestinal flora, as well as 800 new types of viruses that attack intestinal bacteria. In addition, DTU Systems Biology professor Søren Brunak, associate professor Henrik Bjørn Nielsen and their colleagues devised a new principle for analyzing DNA sequence data in order to map the newly discovered...

2014-05-23 11:13:49

DOE/Joint Genome Institute In the Lewis Carroll classic, Through the Looking Glass, Humpty Dumpty states, "When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less." In turn, Alice (of Wonderland fame) says, "The question is, whether you can make words mean so many different things." All organisms on Earth use a genetic code, which is the language in which the building plans for proteins are specified in their DNA. It has long been assumed that there is only one...

Turkeys Inspire Early Warning System For Toxins
2014-01-22 09:28:11

Sarah Yang - University of California, Berkeley Some may think of turkeys as good for just lunch meat and holiday meals. But bioengineers at the University of California, Berkeley, saw inspiration in the big birds for a new type of biosensor that changes color when exposed to chemical vapors. This feature makes the sensors valuable detectors of toxins or airborne pathogens. Turkey skin, it turns out, can shift from red to blue to white, thanks to bundles of collagen that are...

Bacterial 'Syringe' Necessary For Development Of Marine Animals
2014-01-15 08:43:59

California Institute of Technology If you've ever slipped on a slimy wet rock at the beach, you have bacteria to thank. Those bacteria, nestled in a supportive extracellular matrix, form bacterial biofilms—often slimy substances that cling to wet surfaces. For some marine organisms—like corals, sea urchins, and tubeworms—these biofilms serve a vital purpose, flagging suitable homes for such organisms and actually aiding the transformation of larvae to adults. A new study at the...

2014-01-13 10:30:37

Innovative work by two Florida State University scientists that shows the structural and DNA breakdown of a bacteria-invading virus is being featured on the cover of the February issue of the journal Virology. Kathryn Jones and Elizabeth Stroupe, both assistant professors in the Department of Biological Science, have deconstructed a type of virus called a bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. Their work will help researchers in the future have a better understanding of how the virus...

2014-01-10 10:45:38

Scientists discover extracellular vesicles produced by ocean microbes Marine cyanobacteria — tiny ocean plants that produce oxygen and make organic carbon using sunlight and CO2 — are primary engines of Earth's biogeochemical and nutrient cycles. They nourish other organisms through the provision of oxygen and with their own body mass, which forms the base of the ocean food chain. Now scientists at MIT have discovered another dimension of the outsized role played by these tiny...

Marine Tubeworms Need A Push To Transition From Larvae State
2014-01-10 10:03:52

University of Hawaii at Manoa Intriguing bacterium-animal interaction may have implications for boat owners and the mariculture industry, UH Manoa researchers say A common problem at Pearl Harbor, biofouling affects harbors around the world. It's the process by which barnacles, muscles, oysters, and tubeworms accumulate on the bottom of boats and other surfaces. Now researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's Kewalo Marine Laboratory have discovered a biological trigger behind...

2013-12-30 12:21:49

WAGENINGEN, The Netherlands, December 30, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- FDA & USDA announced today they have approved SALMONELEX as a "GRAS" (Generally Recognized as Safe) food processing aid against Salmonella. The new product consists of natural phages against Salmonella and is produced by Micreos of The Netherlands. The company confirms that industrial scale projects with US poultry processors will start in January 2014. According to a report published in December 2013 by...

2013-06-28 23:17:01

Fast-tracked, simultaneous AOAC OMA approval of two assays marks the significance of this complete Listeria package. Durham, NC (PRWEB) June 28, 2013 bioMérieux, a world leader in the field of in vitro diagnostics, today received two First Action Official Methods of Analysis (OMA) approvals from AOAC INTERNATIONAL for innovative food safety testing methods: VIDAS® UP Listeria (LPT) and VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes xpress (LMX). This unprecedented AOAC Expert Review Panel (ERP)...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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