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Latest Bacteriophage Stories

Oceans Have Been The Stage For Earth's Longest Ongoing Battle Between Bacteria And A Virus
2013-02-14 13:55:19

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by Oregon State University reveals that the greatest battle in Earth's history has been going on for hundreds of millions of years. And the battle, which no one knew existed until now, is far from over. The findings of this study were published in a recent issue of Nature. On one side of the battle lines stands SAR11, a bacterium that´s the most abundant organism in the oceans, surviving where most other cells...

2013-01-11 10:16:27

The detailed changes in the structure of a virus as it infects an E. coli bacterium have been observed for the first time, report researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health) Medical School this week in Science Express. To infect a cell, a virus must be able to first find a suitable cell and then eject its genetic material into its host. This robot-like process has been observed in a virus called T7 and...

Common Human Viruses Could Lead To Acne Cure
2012-09-25 10:45:10

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Acne, Propionibacterium acnes, is a common human skin disease that affects hundreds of millions of people every year. It is also the bane of teenagers, causing insecurity and disrupting social life for many. But there may be new hope for pimple poppers everywhere. A new study suggests viruses could be used to treat acne, and effectively kill acne-causing bacteria. By utilizing a harmless virus that lives on the skin, scientists...

2012-04-18 09:20:01

Engineered particles tied to penetratin discover, deliver ligands for mitochondria, ribosomes Scientists who developed a technology for identifying and targeting unique protein receptor ZIP Codes on the cellular surface have found a way to penetrate the outer membrane and deliver engineered particles - called iPhage - to organelles inside the cell. In a paper published today online in Nature Communications, the team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center...

2012-03-19 19:04:49

A growing body of evidence underscores the importance of human gut bacteria in modulating human health, metabolism, and disease. Yet bacteria are only part of the story. Viruses that infect those bacteria also shape who we are. Frederic D. Bushman, PhD, professor of Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, led a study published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that sequenced the DNA of viruses -- the virome -- present...

2012-02-10 10:13:36

Fast-evolving microbe lost a key chunk of its genome after jumping to new host A new study of a devastating bird disease that spread from poultry to house finches in the mid-1990s reveals that the bacteria responsible for the disease evolves at an exceptionally fast rate. What's more, the fast-evolving microbe has lost a key chunk of its genome since jumping to its new host, scientists were surprised to find. The missing portion contained the genes that made up the microbe's immune system,...

Mass Spectrometry Rapidly Detects Staph Infections
2012-01-13 04:12:37

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed a new laboratory test that can rapidly identify the bacterium responsible for staph infections. This new test takes advantage of unique isotopic labeling combined with specific bacteriophage amplification to rapidly identify Staphylococcus aureus. Quickly and accurately detecting infections caused by S. aureus is critical because the pathogenic bacterium causes a...

2011-11-29 10:48:46

A study to be published in the online journal mBio® on November 29 shows that adding antibiotics to swine feed causes microorganisms in the guts of these animals to start sharing genes that could spread antibiotic resistance. Livestock farms use antibiotic drugs regularly, and not just for curing sick animals. Antimicrobial drugs are used as feed additives to boost animal growth, a profitable but controversial practice that is now banned in the European Union and under scrutiny here in...

2011-08-17 14:57:16

In an advance in understanding Mother Nature's copy machines, motors, assembly lines and other biological nano-machines, scientists are describing how a multipurpose protein on the tail of a virus bores into bacteria like a drill bit, clears the shavings out of the hole and enlarges the hole. They report on the "Swiss Army Knife" protein, which enables the virus to pump its genetic material into and thus infect bacteria, in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Akio Kitao and...

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2011-07-22 11:48:42

Pseudomonas aeruginosa targets opponents' cell walls and immunizes itself against its own weapons When competing for food and resources, bacteria employ elaborate strategies to keep rival cells at bay. Scientists have now identified a pathway that allows disease-causing bacteria to attack other bacterial cells by breaking down their cell wall. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a type of bacteria readily found in everyday environments. It easily forms colonies in a wide variety of settings, including...