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Latest Baleen Stories

Ice Age Was No Match For The Dwarf Baleen Whale
2013-04-05 05:29:28

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to new research published in the journal Naturwissenschaften, the dwarf baleen whale lived well into the Ice Age. Researchers from New Zealand's University of Otago found that the fossil of a dwarf baleen whale from Northern California, or Herpetocetus, is thought to be the last survivor of the primitive baleen whale family, dating just 700,000 years old. Otago Department of Geology PhD student Robert Boessenecker said the...

Baleen Whale Teeth Entangle Tiny Prey
2013-03-14 16:15:40

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Whether they hunt for food by opening their mouths while diving deep into the ocean or skimming along its surface, many whale species rely on their baleen teeth to filter tasty morsels from the mouthfuls of seawater they take in. According to Alexander Werth, a biology professor from Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, no one has ever looked into the mechanism behind how the hairy substance actually traps food. “The standard...

New Species Of Whale Discovered In California Fossil Bed
2013-02-19 09:27:37

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Fossil discoveries are nothing new. And finding new species is just as common. But when you find a fossil of an animal new to science, things start to get more interesting–especially when that discovery includes not one, but four new species from the same genus. This is exactly what occurred in the Laguna Canyon outcrop, a fossil bed unearthed during a highway construction project in California in 2000. The site, which was...

Newly Discovered Organ Could Explain Size, Eating Habits Of Some Whales
2012-05-24 07:48:43

Scientists with the Smithsonian Institution and the University of British Columbia (UBC) have discovered a new sensory organ in the rorqual family of whales -- a discovery which sheds new light on their unique feeding behavior and explains why they grow to such massive sizes. The US and Canadian biologists involved in the study located the organ at the tip of the chin of blue, humpback, minke and fin whales, contained within a batch of ligaments connecting the lower jaw bones, according to...

Toothless Whales Use Fat To Listen
2012-04-19 05:52:47

Scientists have long understood the way dolphins and toothed whales have been able to hear underwater. These animals have a special type of fat surrounding their jaws which can relay sounds from the ocean to their ears. Now, thanks to a new study, scientists are able to understand how their toothless grazing cousins, the baleen whales are able to hear without these sound-enhancing jaws. Toothed whales and dolphins are able to use their jaws in conjecture with echolocation in order to...

science-082311-006a
2011-08-23 18:53:14

  Scientists affiliated with the University of Michigan found that skewed skulls may have helped early whales find the direction of sounds in water. Asymmetric skulls are a well-known characteristic of the modern whale group known as "odontocetes" or toothed whales. These whales have modified nasal structures that help produce high-frequency sounds for echolocation. The other modern whale group known as "masticates," or baleen whales, has symmetrical skulls and does not...

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2011-08-18 05:20:00

Scientists have identified a critical step in the evolution of filter-feeding whales' enormous mouths. These whales, otherwise known as baleen whales or mysticetes, have feeding adaptations that are unique among mammals, in that they can filter small marine creatures from huge volumes of water.  The whales accomplish this by using their "loose" lower jaw joints, which enable them to produce a vast filter-feeding gape. A new study of this ancient jawbone has overturned a long-held belief...

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2010-09-30 11:54:35

Genomic record matches fossil record in the whales' common ancestor, say UC Riverside biologists In contrast to a toothed whale, which retains teeth that aid in capturing prey, a living baleen whale (e.g., blue whale, fin whale, humpback, bowhead) has lost its teeth and must sift zooplankton and small fish from ocean waters with baleen or whalebone, a sieve-like structure in the upper jaw that filters food from large mouthfuls of seawater. Based on previous anatomical and fossil data studies,...

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2010-07-01 05:10:00

Fossilized remains of a giant, prehistoric sperm whale that lived 12 million years ago and had teeth and jaws so large it preyed on whales more than half its size have been discovered in Peru's Pisco basin, scientists reported Wednesday. The Leviathan melvillei, named after "Moby Dick" author Herman Melville, grew up to 60 feet long, and had interlocking, tusk-like teeth 14 inches in length for killing and capturing prey, the scientists said. Although paleontologists have long suspected a...

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2010-04-20 12:09:01

An international team of scientists led by the paleontologist Steffen Kiel at the University of Kiel, Germany, found the first fossil boreholes of the worm Osedax that consumes whale bones on the deep-sea floor. They conclude that "boneworms" are at least 30 Million years old. This result was published in the current issue of the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA (PNAS, April 19, 2010). Six years ago Osedax was first described based on specimens...


Latest Baleen Reference Libraries

42_92988e93ecd228a910289af0ad7b282a
2006-07-12 13:11:55

The Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus), also called the Finback Whale and belongs to the baleen whales suborder. It is the second largest whale and also the second largest animal currently living. The Fin whale can grow to 85 ft (26 m) long. The fin Whale can be found worldwide and in Europe is readily seen in the Bay of Biscay. Taxonomy The Fin Whale is a close relative of the Blue Whale. The differences began to occur between 3 and 5 million years ago. Hybrids between the two...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.