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Latest Bangor University Stories

2012-08-09 00:49:14

Research at Bangor University has identified a switch in cells that may help to kill tumors with heat. Prostate cancer and other localized tumors can be effectively treated by a combination of heat and an anti-cancer drug that damages the genes. Behind this novel therapy is the enigmatic ability of heat to switch off essential survival mechanisms in human cells. Although thermotherapy is now more widely used, the underlying principles are still unclear. In a recent publication in the...

2012-05-22 18:40:16

Powerful and versatile new genetic tools that will assist in safeguarding both European fish stocks and European consumers is reported in Nature Communications (DOI 10.1038/ncomms1845 22/05/12). The paper reports on the first system proven to identify populations of fish species to a forensic level of validation. With up to 25% of fish catches being caught illegally across the world, and with an estimated cost to Europe of up to 10 billion by 2020, the EU were eager to address the problems...

2012-05-09 09:26:58

'How reading in a second language protects your heart' Psychologists at Bangor University believe that they have glimpsed for the first time, a process that takes place deep within our unconscious brain, where primal reactions interact with higher mental processes. Writing in the Journal of Neuroscience (May 9, 2012 • 32(19):6485— 6489 • 6485), they identify a reaction to negative language inputs which shuts down unconscious processing. For the last quarter of a...

Madagascar Wildlife Facing Threat Of Illegal Hunting
2011-12-16 05:48:26

Researchers have found that illegal hunting of protected species in Madagascar could cause an urgent threat to the country's globally important biodiversity. The scientists said that hunting of protected species in eastern Madagascar is increasing due to rapid social change. "Our observations suggest that young men have more available cash and leisure time due to the transition from subsistence farming to panning for gold, and they spend more time in local bars, eating fried meat snacks...

2011-11-21 09:21:20

Drought causes peat to release far more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than has previously been realized Climate change effect on release of CO2 from peat far greater than assumed Drought causes peat to release far more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than has previously been realized. Much of the world's peatlands lie in regions predicted to experience increased frequency and severity of drought as a result of climate change- leading to the peat drying out and releasing vast...

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2011-05-26 10:16:06

A team of scientists from the University of Sheffield and Bangor University have used a computer climate model to study how freshwater entering the oceans at the end of the penultimate Ice Age 140,000 years ago affected the parts of the ocean currents that control climate. A paper based on the research, co-authored by Professor Grant Bigg, Head of the University of Sheffield's Department of Geography, his PhD student Clare Green, and Dr Mattias Green, a Senior Research fellow at Bangor...

2011-01-05 22:58:13

Peer into any stream in a South American rainforest and you may well see a small shoal of similar-looking miniature catfish. But don't be fooled into thinking that they are all the same species. An extensive investigation of South American Corydoras catfish, (reported in Nature 6.1.11), reveals that catfish communities- although containing almost identically coloured and patterned fish, could actually contain three or more different species. Establishing for the first time that many species...

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2009-04-10 07:10:19

A Welsh university student has recently discovered that the potency and composition of a snake's venom are largely determined by its location and diet. Axel Barlow, a student at Bangor University in Wales, observed that the toxins in snake's venom appear to be specifically designed for the kinds of prey that they feed on.  As part of his final-year paper, Barlow was studying the saw-scale viper, a snake whose natural habitat reaches from northern Africa, across the Middle East and as far...

2008-09-10 18:00:27

By John Hughes Bangor University DESi Gntechnology, product design and manufactureat the College of Education and Lifelong Learning at Bangor University continues to develop its links with Engineering Education Scheme Wales. John Hughes, director of BSc courses at the College of Education and Lifelong Learning, sees this relationship with EESW not only asa means of introducing pupils to engineering, but as away of bringing together communities. North Wales has had a tradition of...

2008-07-22 18:00:34

One of the world's leading centres for climate-change science will be created in Ceredigion, it was announced yesterday. Funding cuts put the former plant breeding station at Gogerddan, Aberystwyth, under threat of closure 18 months ago. Its future was secured with the Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research's merger with Aberystwyth University this year, creating the Institute for Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (Ibers). Now the Welsh Assembly Government has...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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