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Latest Bar-headed Goose Stories

Bar-headed Geese Give Insight Into Low Oxygen Tolerance
2014-04-08 14:58:41

University of Exeter A new study into how the world's highest flying bird, the bar-headed goose, is able to survive at extreme altitudes may have future implications for low oxygen medical conditions in humans. An international team of scientists recently tracked the bar-headed goose while it migrated across the Himalayas. Now they have shown how these birds are able to tolerate running at top speed while breathing only 7% oxygen. Exercising at high altitude is a massive challenge...

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2011-02-17 10:38:45

Imagine a woman riding a motor scooter down the street while flanked by a large bird flying almost cheek to beak with her. Could this be a harrowing scene from that famous Hitchcock horror movie, "The Birds?" Winged victory No: it's a carefully planned scene from an ongoing research project on a species of bird, the bar-headed goose, that is led by Jessica Meir of the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. Meir is studying bar-headed geese for their special abilities: they...


Latest Bar-headed Goose Reference Libraries

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2006-03-07 14:44:45

The Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) is easily distinguished from any of the other grey geese of the genus Anser by the character implied by its English name. It is also much paler than the other geese in this genus. Its breeding habitat is in Central Asia and it migrates over the Himalayas to winter in the wetlands of India. It is believed to be the highest flying bird and has been seen at up to 30,000 feet. It lays 3-8 eggs in a nest near mountain lakes. In flight, its call is a...

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Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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