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Latest Barnacle Stories

Marine Tubeworms Need A Push To Transition From Larvae State
2014-01-10 10:03:52

University of Hawaii at Manoa Intriguing bacterium-animal interaction may have implications for boat owners and the mariculture industry, UH Manoa researchers say A common problem at Pearl Harbor, biofouling affects harbors around the world. It's the process by which barnacles, muscles, oysters, and tubeworms accumulate on the bottom of boats and other surfaces. Now researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's Kewalo Marine Laboratory have discovered a biological trigger behind...

Unity Between Gorgonian Host And 2 New Barnacle Species
2013-02-27 10:27:23

Pensoft Publishers Two new species of the gorgonian inhabiting barnacles – Conopea saotomensis and Conopea fidelis – have been collected from the area surrounding the historically isolated volcanic islands of São Tomé and Príncipe. The barnacles of this genus are widely spread across the temperate and tropical oceans, but what makes them special is that they occur exclusively in a symbiotic relationship with a gorgonian or black coral...

Fouling Of ships' Hulls Prevented With New Paints
2012-06-11 11:02:01

The colonization of hulls by algae, barnacles, mussels and other organisms is a major problem for both pleasure boats and merchant tonnage. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed new environmentally-friendly and effective bottom paints to prevent this. Fouling is a major problem, leading to higher fuel consumption and so increased air pollution. It can also cause the spread of alien species that do not...

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2010-08-24 12:40:00

Chemists discover how oysters bond together to form massive reef complexes Oyster reefs are on the decline, with over-harvesting and pollution reducing some stocks as much as 98 percent over the last two centuries. With a growing awareness of oysters' critical roles filtering water, preventing erosion, guarding coasts from storm damage, and providing habitat for other organisms, researchers have been investigating how oyster reefs form in order to better understand the organisms and offer...

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2010-08-16 12:25:00

The substance medetomidine has proved effective in preventing fouling of ship bottoms. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have now identified the gene that causes the barnacle to react to the substance, opening up the possibility of an antifouling paint that is gentle both on barnacles and on the environment. Fouling of hulls is a major problem for world shipping, for private leisure craft as well as large cargo ships. The University of Gothenburg has attempted to develop new,...

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2010-03-03 09:58:54

The barnacle, a key thread in the marine food web, was thought to be missing along rocky coasts dominated by upwelling. Now a research team headed by Brown University marine ecologist Jon Witman has found the opposite to be true: Barnacle populations thrive in vertical upwelling zones in moderately deep waters in the Galapagos Islands. The findings appear in Ecological Monographs. There's been a rich debate in marine ecological circles about what happens to a key food source along rocky...

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2009-10-16 13:50:43

Researchers have solved the mystery of how barnacles attach themselves to other objects, showing that barnacle glue binds together exactly the same way as human blood does when it clots, BBC News reported. Barnacles are crustaceans that live in shallow ocean environments. As larvae they affix to hard substrates, then remain stationary for the rest of their lives. The barnacles secrete an adhesive substance in order to attach themselves to a surface. Scientists have long been aware of the...

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2009-05-28 09:53:30

North Carolina State University engineers have created a non-toxic "wrinkled" coating for use on ship hulls that resisted buildup of troublesome barnacles during 18 months of seawater tests, a finding that could ultimately save boat owners millions of dollars in cleaning and fuel costs. The research conducted by Dr. Kirill Efimenko, research assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Dr. Jan Genzer, professor in the same department, shows for the first...

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2008-05-20 08:57:22

First identified in 1899, y-larvae have been one of the greatest zoological mysteries for over a century. No one has ever found an adult of these puzzling crustaceans, despite the plethora of these larvae in plankton, leading generations of marine zoologists to wonder just what y-larvae grow up to be. A study published in BioMed Central's open access journal, BMC Biology, reports the transformation of the larvae into a previously unseen, wholly un-crustacean-like, parasitic form.Y larvae, or...

2005-07-18 04:50:00

Covering ship hulls with artificial shark skin could help ships sailing smoothly. The growth of marine organisms such as barnacles on ship hulls is a major cause of increased energy costs in the naval industry. Shark skin offers a structural design that prevents this so called 'bio-fouling'. Ralph Liedert from the University of Applied Sciences, Bremen, Germany, is presenting his work on the application of artificial shark skin in a new anti-fouling strategy at the Society for Experimental...


Latest Barnacle Reference Libraries

Ochre Sea Star, Pisaster ochraceus
2013-08-11 13:34:24

The ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), also known as the ochre starfish or the purple sea star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Asteriidae family. This species can be found in the Pacific Ocean in a range that extends from Santa Barbara Co., California to Prince William Sound in Alaska. This species holds one subspecies, known as Pisaster ochraceus segnis, which can be found in warmer waters that the ochre sea star. Adult individuals prefer a habit in rocky areas at...

Giant Sea Star, Pisaster giganteus
2013-08-09 10:08:32

The giant sea star (Pisaster giganteus) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Asteriidae family. It can be found along the western coasts of North America, with a range that extends from British Columbia to southern California. It resides in areas with low tides, where sand contains abundant substrate to which the starfish can cling. The giant sea star is broad and holds wide arms, reaching between 14.1 and 18.8 inches from arm to arm. Like other starfish species, this sea...

Pink Sea Star, Pisaster brevispinus
2013-08-09 10:05:29

The pink sea star (Pisaster brevispinus), also known as the short-spined sea star or the giant pink sea star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Asteriidae family that can be found in the Pacific Ocean. It prefers to reside in muddy or sandy areas at depths of up to 590 feet, although smaller individuals can be found in rocky areas. This species was made famous by the show Spongebob Squarepants, where the main character’s best friend is a pink sea star. The pink sea...

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2006-03-07 15:20:49

The Barnacle Goose (Branta leucopsis) belongs to the genus of black geese named Branta. This genus contains species with mostly black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey Anser species. Despite its superficial outward similarity to the Brent Goose, genetic analysis has shown it is an eastern derivative of the Cackling Goose lineage. It is easily identified by its largely black plumage and white face. Its call is a "kaw". During breeding season, Barnacle Geese can be found mainly on...

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