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Latest Basal ganglia Stories

2011-10-05 19:12:51

Our behavior is often guided by the desire to obtain positive outcomes and avoid negative consequences, and neuroscientists have put a great deal of effort into looking for reward and punishment "centers" in the brain. Now, new research published by Cell Press in the October 6 issue of the journal Neuron reveals that neural signals related to reinforcement and punishment are far more broadly distributed throughout the entire human brain than was previously thought. Understanding the neural...

2011-07-28 12:49:08

In humans, inherited mutations in a gene called HPRT1 lead to very specific self-destructive behavior. Boys with Lesch-Nyhan disease experience uncontrollable urges to bite their fingers, slam their arms into doorways and otherwise harm themselves. Puzzlingly, mice with mutations in the same gene don't behave differently than normal mice. Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a gene related to HPRT1, present in humans but not in mice that helps explain this...

2011-06-09 14:58:04

Smaller brain volumes associated with severity of ADHD symptoms In a study published today in the Clinical Neuropsychologist (e-publication ahead of print), researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found differences in the brain development of preschool children with symptoms of Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Results showed the region of the brain important for cognitive and motor control was smaller in these children than in typically developing children. Novel for...

2011-03-09 13:57:05

Expectations for the improvement of a neurosurgical treatment, the deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders Movement disorders such as Parkinson's diseases and dystonia are caused by abnormal neural activity of the basal ganglia located deep in the brain. The basal ganglia are connected to the cerebral cortex in the brain surface through complex neural circuits. Their basic structure and connections, as well as the dysfunctions in movement disorders, have been examined extensively...

2011-01-21 00:00:50

New findings reported this week in Science by researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute (BSI) shed first-ever light on the neural mechanisms that enable board game experts to quickly generate optimal moves. Results identify specific brain regions involved in granting shogi masters their superior skill, offering insights into the neural origins of expert intuition. (PRWeb UK) January 20, 2011 What makes experts different from the rest of us? Over the past century, this question has...

2010-11-04 01:45:24

Brain research over the past 30 years has shown that if a part of the brain controlling movement or sensation or language is lost because of a stroke or injury, other parts of the brain can take over the lost function "“ often as well as the region that was lost. New research at the University of California, Berkeley, shows that this holds true for memory and attention as well, though "” at least for memory "” the intact brain helps out only when needed and conducts business...

2010-11-04 01:27:21

'Phantom' images our brain keeps for visual comparisons stored in brain's neural network Brain research over the past 30 years has shown that if a part of the brain controlling movement or sensation or language is lost because of a stroke or injury, other parts of the brain can take over the lost function "“ often as well as the region that was lost. New research at the University of California, Berkeley, shows that this holds true for memory and attention as well, though "“ at...

2010-10-21 00:39:31

Some people may excel at riding a bike, tying a tie, or playing the piano, but those same people may find it difficult to explain or teach those skills to someone else. These motor skills are learned in one part of the brain, whereas classroom instruction and information read in a book are acquired in another area of the brain, explained F. Gregory Ashby, professor and chair of UC Santa Barbara's Department of Psychology. This second area of learning is the frontal cortex "“"“ the...

2010-10-19 16:49:41

An international collaboration led by academics at the University of Sheffield, has shed new light into Parkinson´s disease, which could help with the development of cures or treatments in the future. The collaboration, which was led by Professor Peter Redgrave from the University´s Department of Psychology, suggests that many of the problems suffered by patients with Parkinson´s disease - difficulties in initiating actions, slow...

2010-07-22 01:20:58

Rui Costa, Principal Investigator of the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (Portugal), and Xin Jin, of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health (USA), describe in the latest issue of the journal Nature(*), that the activity of certain neurons in the brain can signal the initiation and termination of behavioural sequences we learn anew. Furthermore, they found that this brain activity is...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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