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2015-02-10 12:23:12

Seeking Solutions for Efficient Chemical Storage of Energy for Stationary Applications CLEVELAND, Feb.

2015-02-10 12:22:45

DUBLIN, Feb .10, 2015 /PRNewswire/ --Research and Markets

2015-02-09 16:27:35

LONDON, Feb. 9, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- UV curing is a photochemical process in which ultra violet radiations are used to instantly cure coatings.

2015-02-09 16:27:33

LONDON, Feb. 9, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The report covers the global coating resins market and further divides the market on the basis of resin type, technology, application, and region.

2015-02-09 08:25:13

- Open to U.S. and Canadian Ph.D. students and young researchers FLORHAM PARK, N.J., Feb.

2015-02-05 16:21:50

LONDON, Feb.

2015-02-05 08:25:28

SAN FRANCISCO, February 5, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- New Market Research Reports Title 'Global Mining Chemicals Market Analysis, Size And Segment Forecasts To 2020' has Been

2015-02-04 08:23:27

SAN FRANCISCO, February 4, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- New Market Research Reports Title 'Global Bio Solvents Market Analysis, Size And Segment Forecasts To 2020' has Been Added

2015-02-03 16:23:47

Paints and Coatings Market by Product Segment (High Solids/Radiation Cure, Powder Coatings, Waterborne Coatings, Solvent Borne Technologies and Others) For Automotives & Aviation, Medical & Healthcare,


Latest BASF Reference Libraries

Amflora
2013-10-03 07:51:27

Amflora, known also as EH92-527-1, is a genetically modified potato developed by BASF Plant Science. Amflora potato plant produces pure amylopectin starch that is processed to waxy potato starch. Amflora was approved for industrial applications in the European Union market on March 2, 2010 by the European Commission. It was originally registered on August 5, 1996. Amflora was developed by geneticist Lennart Erjefalt and agronomist Juri Kano of Svalof Weibull AB. Because of the lack of...

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Word of the Day
honeyguide
  • Any of various tropical Old World birds of the family Indicatoridae, some species of which lead people or animals to the nests of wild honeybees. The birds eat the wax and larvae that remain after the nest has been destroyed for its honey.
Honeyguide birds have even been known to eat candles.