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Latest Bats Stories

Social Networks Of Endangered Indiana Bat Tapped Into To Aid In Habitat Management
2014-06-18 03:00:40

Lynn Davis, Virginia Tech Depending on habitat availability, the endangered Indiana bat may be able to use its social connections to survive a certain amount of roost destruction, according to research by scientists at Virginia Tech and The Ohio State University. Alexander Silvis of Lynchburg, Ohio, and Andrew Kniowski of Boones Mill, Virginia, both doctoral students in Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment, made findings from Ohio State field studies highly...

UV Light Used As A New Tool To Detect White-Nose Syndrome In Bats
2014-05-30 12:22:49

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, biologists looking to identify bats with the deadly white-nose syndrome have a new, non-invasive tool – ultraviolet light. The study authors found that when they directed UV light at the wings of bats with WNS, microscopic skin lesions on the animals fluoresce with a distinctive orange-yellow color. “When we first saw this fluorescence of a bat wing in a cave, we knew...

A Refined Technique On Sampling Bat Population Sizes Developed
2014-05-29 14:25:11

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For years, researchers have been using acoustic monitoring technology to assess the bat population in specific areas. Researchers conducting a new study around Form Drum in upstate New York have now developed a refined method on this non-invasive sampling technique. Published in the Journal of Ecology and the Natural Environment, the new study concluded that transect sampling — installing a row of detectors for a week, then moving...

Scientists Describe Two New Species Of Yellow-shouldered Bats
2014-04-17 13:35:01

Pensoft Publishers Lying forgotten in museum collections two new species of yellow-shouldered bats have been unearthed by scientists at the American Museum of New York and The Field Museum of Natural History and described in the open access journal ZooKeys. These two new additions to the genus Sturnira are part of a recent discovery of three bats hidden away in collections around the world, the third one still waiting to be officially announced. Up until recently the genus Sturnira was...

2014-03-20 08:24:21

Third generation Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT represent breakthrough in wildlife recording technology MAYNARD, Mass., March 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Wildlife Acoustics, the worldwide provider of bioacoustics recording and analytical technology, is shipping its new, 3(rd) generation Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT bioacoustics recorders. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140320/NE85896 "Our new Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT sets a new performance benchmark for bioacoustics recorders", said...

2014-02-24 23:04:07

Horne’s Pest Control Company offers tips on dealing with bats as they come back from hibernating all winter. Martinez, GA (PRWEB) February 24, 2014 The weather is getting warmer, which also means that bats are slowly starting to awaken and migrate back to their spring and summer habitat after hibernating all winter long. With the start of the spring season, Horne’s Pest Control recommends that people protect the bats around their home, rather than trying to kill them. Most people know...

Fossilized Teeth Show Bat Family Belongs To Primitive Lineage, Had Broad Range
2014-02-06 10:01:59

Duke University Today, Madagascar sucker-footed bats live nowhere outside their island home, but new research shows that hasn't always been the case. The discovery of two extinct relatives in northern Egypt suggests the unusual creatures, which evolved sticky footpads to roost on slick surfaces, are primitive members of a group of bats that evolved in Africa and ultimately went on to flourish in South America. A team of researchers described the two bat species from several sets of...

Researchers Reveal New Clues Of Bat Killer’s Path
2014-01-30 11:08:17

The University of Akron As North American bats face a death toll approaching 7 million, University of Akron scientists reveal new clues about their killer, White Nose Syndrome, or WNS. The UA researchers reveal that the deadly WNS fungus can likely survive in caves with or without the presence of bats and threatens the regional extinction of North American bats. This discovery casts a gloomy forecast for the curious flying mammals, which serve as critical food plant pollinators and...

Bats Rely On Vision To Navigate, Echolocation To Catch Insects: Study
2013-12-13 07:34:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online\ Bats rule the night skies, using the power of echolocation, or reflected sound. More than 1,000 species of echolocating bats exist, compared to just 80 species of nocturnal non-echolocating birds. It seems that normal vision works in tandem with echolocation to give bats an evolutionary edge, however, no one knows exactly how. A new study, led by Arjan Boonman and Yossi Yovel of Tel Aviv University's Department of Zoology, suggests...

Bat White Nose Fungus Is Rubust
2013-10-25 15:38:50

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A fungus has been decimating bat colonies for at least the last seven years, infecting bats during their winter hibernation, leaving them weak and vulnerable to starvation and secondary infections. Bats infected with Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans often have a distinctive white fungal growth around their muzzle, a sign of what is commonly referred to as white-nose syndrome. In a study published earlier this week by the journal...


Latest Bats Reference Libraries

Common Bent-wing bat, Miniopterus schreibersii
2013-09-18 15:24:07

This species is part of the largest group of bats in the Vespertilionidae family and are found in subtropical regions such as Australia, Ethiopia, Europe and some Asian areas. Large caves or mines are ideal locations where colonies ranging from a few dozen to several million can hibernate. Hibernation lasts for about 12 days. Colonies will migrate several times a year depending on the weather patterns and as far away as 520 miles. Although the Common Bent-wing Bat is dependent on...

Sulawesi Flying Fox, Acerodon celebensis
2013-08-29 10:18:35

The Sulawesi flying fox (Acerodon celebensis), also known as the Sulawesi fruit bat, is a species of mega bat that can be found in the Sulawesi subregion of Indonesia. Its range includes areas of Sulawesi, Butan like Mangole, Sanana, Selayar, Talenge, and Sangihe. It occurs at elevations of up to 4,921 feet in lowland habitats. It is often found in coastal areas near human settlements on the Sula Islands, causing experts to believe that it can withstand a small amount of human disturbance....

Grey-Headed Flying Fox, Pteropus poliocephalus
2013-07-09 15:17:51

The grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) is a species of megabat that can be found in Australia. Its range includes a large area east of the Great Dividing Range that extends from Geelong to Bundaberg and includes Finch Hatton, Ingham, and Adelaide. It prefers a habitat within many areas including swamps, rainforests, and woodlands. The grey-headed flying fox is the largest bat within its range, reaching an average body length between 9.1 and 11.4 inches, a wingspan of up to 3.3...

Black-eared Flying Fox, Pteropus melanotus
2013-07-08 14:47:02

The black-eared flying fox (Pteropus melanotus), also known as the Christmas Island flying fox or Blyth's flying fox, is a species of megabat that can be found in India, Indonesia, and Australia. It has a limited range that includes the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in India, Sumatra in Indonesia, and Christmas Island in Australia. It is thought to prefer a habitat within mangrove forests near swamps and can be found at elevations of up to 3,280 feet above sea level. The black-eared flying...

Samoa Flying Fox, Pteropus samoensis
2013-07-08 14:43:23

The Samoa flying fox (Pteropus samoensis), also known as the Samoan flying fox, is a species of megabat that can be found in Samoa, American Samoa, and Fiji. It prefers a habitat within tropical and subtropical forests, but it can also be found near villages or plantations. It roosts in small colonies or alone in the forest canopy and females are thought to give birth to one pup per year. The Samoa flying fox is threatened by habitat loss and hunting in some areas of its range, but it can...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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