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Latest Bats Stories

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2010-03-30 06:35:00

For years, Brown University neuroscientist James Simmons has filmed bats as they flew in packs or individually chased prey in thick foliage. All the while, he asked himself why the bats never collided with objects in their paths or with each other. "You wonder, how do they do it?" he said. After a series of innovative experiments designed to mimic a thick forest, Simmons and colleagues at Brown and in Japan have discovered how bats are so adept at avoiding objects, real or perceived. In a...

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2010-03-29 15:18:53

Despite the fact that bats are active after sunset, they rely on the sun as their most trusted source of navigation. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology found that the greater mouse-eared bat orients itself with the help of the earth's magnetic field at night and calibrates this compass to the sun's position at sunset (published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, PNAS, March 29th, 2010) Since the 1940s it has been known that bats use echolocation...

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2010-01-25 07:25:00

3-D imaging differentiates how various bats generate biosonar signals Researchers at The University of Western Ontario (Western) led an international and multi-disciplinary study that sheds new light on the way that bats echolocate. With echolocation, animals emit sounds and then listen to the reflected echoes of those sounds to form images of their surroundings in their brains. The team used state-of-the-art micro-computed tomography systems at the Robarts Research Institute in London,...

2010-01-12 12:34:00

Three years later, hibernating bats continue to fall to this disorder HARRISBURG, Pa., Jan. 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- White Nose Syndrome (WNS) has caused cave bat population reductions in New York and New England over the past three winters. It surfaced near Albany in 2006. Pennsylvania Game Commission officials say that they are expecting cave bat mortalities this winter if the disorder spreads through hibernacula as it did New York and New England over the previous winters. To track...

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2009-12-15 07:18:59

In first-time experiments in the wild, a researcher at Brown University has discovered that a species of bat in Madagascar, Myzopoda aurita, uses wet adhesion to attach itself to surfaces. The finding explains why the bat "” unlike almost all others "” roosts head-up. It also helps to explain how it differs from a similar head-up roosting species. Results appear in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. There are approximately 1,200 species of bats worldwide. Of that...

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2009-11-23 09:22:59

Researchers reconstruct the evolution of bat migration with the aid of a mathematical model Not just birds, but also a few species of bats face a long journey every year. Researchers at Princeton University in the U.S. and at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Radolfzell, Germany studied the migratory behavior of the largest extant family of bats, the so-called "Vespertilionidae" with the help of mathematical models. They discovered that the migration over short as well as long...

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2009-10-29 15:39:57

Spanish researchers have confirmed that the largest bat in Europe, Nyctalus lasiopterus, was present in north-eastern Spain during the Late Pleistocene (between 120,000 and 10,000 years ago). The Greater Noctule fossils found in the excavation site at Abríc Romaní (Barcelona) prove that this bat had a greater geographical presence more than 10,000 years ago than it does today, having declined due to the reduction in vegetation cover. Although this research...

2009-10-16 14:19:00

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., Oct. 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- To avoid becoming a bat's tasty treat, a species of tiger moth plays a trick with sound. The moth can make up to 450 ultrasonic clicks in a tenth of a second to jam the hungry bat's sonar and escape death. The discovery was made by Aaron Corcoran, a Wake Forest University graduate student, and William Conner, professor of biology at Wake Forest. "This is the first example of prey that jams biological sonar," Conner says....

2009-07-29 10:23:16

A bizarre New Zealand bat that is as much at home walking four-legged on the ground as winging through the air had an Australian ancestor 20 million years ago with the same rare ability, a new study has found.The discovery overturns a long-held held view that the agile walking and climbing skills of the lesser short-tailed bat - Mystacina tuberculata "“ evolved in the absence of any ground-dwelling mammal competitors or predators, says an international team of researchers led by Dr...

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2009-07-07 15:40:00

A research paper co-written by a Virginia Tech faculty member explains a 60-year mystery behind a rare bat's nose that is unusually large for its species. The findings soon will be published in the scientific trade journal, Physical Review Letters.The article, "Acoustic effects accurately predict an extreme case of biological morphology," by Z. Zhang, R. Mller, and S.N. Truong, details the adult Bourret's horseshoe bat (known scientifically as the "Rhinolophus paradoxolophus," meaning...


Latest Bats Reference Libraries

Common Bent-wing bat, Miniopterus schreibersii
2013-09-18 15:24:07

This species is part of the largest group of bats in the Vespertilionidae family and are found in subtropical regions such as Australia, Ethiopia, Europe and some Asian areas. Large caves or mines are ideal locations where colonies ranging from a few dozen to several million can hibernate. Hibernation lasts for about 12 days. Colonies will migrate several times a year depending on the weather patterns and as far away as 520 miles. Although the Common Bent-wing Bat is dependent on...

Sulawesi Flying Fox, Acerodon celebensis
2013-08-29 10:18:35

The Sulawesi flying fox (Acerodon celebensis), also known as the Sulawesi fruit bat, is a species of mega bat that can be found in the Sulawesi subregion of Indonesia. Its range includes areas of Sulawesi, Butan like Mangole, Sanana, Selayar, Talenge, and Sangihe. It occurs at elevations of up to 4,921 feet in lowland habitats. It is often found in coastal areas near human settlements on the Sula Islands, causing experts to believe that it can withstand a small amount of human disturbance....

Grey-Headed Flying Fox, Pteropus poliocephalus
2013-07-09 15:17:51

The grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) is a species of megabat that can be found in Australia. Its range includes a large area east of the Great Dividing Range that extends from Geelong to Bundaberg and includes Finch Hatton, Ingham, and Adelaide. It prefers a habitat within many areas including swamps, rainforests, and woodlands. The grey-headed flying fox is the largest bat within its range, reaching an average body length between 9.1 and 11.4 inches, a wingspan of up to 3.3...

Black-eared Flying Fox, Pteropus melanotus
2013-07-08 14:47:02

The black-eared flying fox (Pteropus melanotus), also known as the Christmas Island flying fox or Blyth's flying fox, is a species of megabat that can be found in India, Indonesia, and Australia. It has a limited range that includes the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in India, Sumatra in Indonesia, and Christmas Island in Australia. It is thought to prefer a habitat within mangrove forests near swamps and can be found at elevations of up to 3,280 feet above sea level. The black-eared flying...

Samoa Flying Fox, Pteropus samoensis
2013-07-08 14:43:23

The Samoa flying fox (Pteropus samoensis), also known as the Samoan flying fox, is a species of megabat that can be found in Samoa, American Samoa, and Fiji. It prefers a habitat within tropical and subtropical forests, but it can also be found near villages or plantations. It roosts in small colonies or alone in the forest canopy and females are thought to give birth to one pup per year. The Samoa flying fox is threatened by habitat loss and hunting in some areas of its range, but it can...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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