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Latest Bats Stories

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2009-07-07 15:40:00

A research paper co-written by a Virginia Tech faculty member explains a 60-year mystery behind a rare bat's nose that is unusually large for its species. The findings soon will be published in the scientific trade journal, Physical Review Letters.The article, "Acoustic effects accurately predict an extreme case of biological morphology," by Z. Zhang, R. Mller, and S.N. Truong, details the adult Bourret's horseshoe bat (known scientifically as the "Rhinolophus paradoxolophus," meaning...

2009-06-30 12:03:18

Scientists from Texas are batty over a new discovery which could lead to the single most important medical breakthrough in human history"”significantly longer lifespans. The discovery, featured on the cover of the July 2009 print issue of The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org), shows that proper protein folding over time in long-lived bats explains why they live significantly longer than other mammals of comparable size, such as mice."Ultimately we are trying to discover what...

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2009-06-18 13:54:35

Slow-flying, woodland bats "” which tend to be at greater risk from extinction than their speedier kin "” really don't like the light, according to a study published online on June 18th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. Lesser horseshoe bats will stray from their usual flight routes to steer clear of the artificial glow from lights that are similar to everyday street lights, the new report shows. The echolocation bats depend on to navigate their way in the dark doesn't...

2009-06-09 13:13:28

German scientists have discovered bats can use echolocation in identifying characteristics of other individual bats' voices to recognize each other. Researchers from the University of Tuebingen and the University of Applied Sciences in Konstanz said they first tested the ability of four greater mouse-eared bats to distinguish between the echolocation calls of other bats. After observing the bats learned to discriminate the voices of other bats, then they programmed a computer model that...

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2009-06-05 14:10:00

Experts warned Congress on Thursday that a mysterious fungus attacking America's bats represents the most serious threat to wildlife in a century and could spread nationwide within years. The condition, known as white-nose syndrome, gets its name from the white fungus speckled amongst the bats, reports the Associated Press. Experts told two House subcommittees on Thursday about discovering caves where bats had been decimated by the disease. "One cave there was turned into a morgue, with bats...

2009-06-05 09:05:47

Bats can use the characteristics of other bats' voices to recognize each other, according to a study by researchers from the University of Tuebingen, Germany and the University of Applied Sciences in Konstanz, Germany. The study, published June 5 in the open-access journal PLoS Computational Biology, explains how bats use echolocation for more than just spatial knowledge.The researchers first tested the ability of four greater mouse-eared bats to distinguish between the echolocation calls of...

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2009-05-02 11:20:00

A fungus, which has reportedly already killed an estimated 500,000 bats, is causing the U.S. Forest Service to close thousands of caves and former mines in national forests in 33 states in an attempt to control the problem. The problem was first noticed in New York and after two years had spread to caves in both Virginia and West Virginia. 99% of the bats infected have died. While there is no reason to believe the fungus poses a threat to humans, bats have been dying at a startling rate from...

2009-04-27 11:41:00

Wildlife Companies & Homeowners must exercise patience when evicting bat colonies containing youngsters. ORTONVILLE, Mich., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Storks aren't marking their arrival, but make no mistake: the time-tested ways of the birds and the bees will be bearing fruit in late May. Maternity wards are filled with expectant mothers, and the next generation of baby bats are about to appear. Attics are perfect abodes for bats, but that feeling isn't mutual for their human...

2009-03-29 15:26:34

Scientists say they are racing to discover what it is causing a massive die-off of bats in Connecticut before the condition spreads to the U.S. South. As many as 90 percent of Connecticut's bats have died during winter hibernation after being infected by a rare fungus usually only found in Arctic tundra regions, and scientists are working to find a cause before the white-nose syndrome is spread to the large bat populations of the U.S. South, The Hartford (Conn.) Courant reported Sunday. The...

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2009-03-21 09:10:00

A Brown University-led research team has documented for the first time how bats land. The results are surprising: Not all bats land the same way. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Experimental Biology, could offer new insights into how the second-largest order of mammals evolved. People have always been fascinated by bats, but the scope of that interest generally is limited to how bats fly and their bizarre habit of sleeping upside down. Until now, no one had studied how bats...


Latest Bats Reference Libraries

Common Bent-wing bat, Miniopterus schreibersii
2013-09-18 15:24:07

This species is part of the largest group of bats in the Vespertilionidae family and are found in subtropical regions such as Australia, Ethiopia, Europe and some Asian areas. Large caves or mines are ideal locations where colonies ranging from a few dozen to several million can hibernate. Hibernation lasts for about 12 days. Colonies will migrate several times a year depending on the weather patterns and as far away as 520 miles. Although the Common Bent-wing Bat is dependent on...

Sulawesi Flying Fox, Acerodon celebensis
2013-08-29 10:18:35

The Sulawesi flying fox (Acerodon celebensis), also known as the Sulawesi fruit bat, is a species of mega bat that can be found in the Sulawesi subregion of Indonesia. Its range includes areas of Sulawesi, Butan like Mangole, Sanana, Selayar, Talenge, and Sangihe. It occurs at elevations of up to 4,921 feet in lowland habitats. It is often found in coastal areas near human settlements on the Sula Islands, causing experts to believe that it can withstand a small amount of human disturbance....

Grey-Headed Flying Fox, Pteropus poliocephalus
2013-07-09 15:17:51

The grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) is a species of megabat that can be found in Australia. Its range includes a large area east of the Great Dividing Range that extends from Geelong to Bundaberg and includes Finch Hatton, Ingham, and Adelaide. It prefers a habitat within many areas including swamps, rainforests, and woodlands. The grey-headed flying fox is the largest bat within its range, reaching an average body length between 9.1 and 11.4 inches, a wingspan of up to 3.3...

Black-eared Flying Fox, Pteropus melanotus
2013-07-08 14:47:02

The black-eared flying fox (Pteropus melanotus), also known as the Christmas Island flying fox or Blyth's flying fox, is a species of megabat that can be found in India, Indonesia, and Australia. It has a limited range that includes the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in India, Sumatra in Indonesia, and Christmas Island in Australia. It is thought to prefer a habitat within mangrove forests near swamps and can be found at elevations of up to 3,280 feet above sea level. The black-eared flying...

Samoa Flying Fox, Pteropus samoensis
2013-07-08 14:43:23

The Samoa flying fox (Pteropus samoensis), also known as the Samoan flying fox, is a species of megabat that can be found in Samoa, American Samoa, and Fiji. It prefers a habitat within tropical and subtropical forests, but it can also be found near villages or plantations. It roosts in small colonies or alone in the forest canopy and females are thought to give birth to one pup per year. The Samoa flying fox is threatened by habitat loss and hunting in some areas of its range, but it can...

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Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin