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Latest Baylor College of Medicine Stories

2012-05-18 11:22:29

As a basketball player scans he court, looking for an opening, his brain captures the position of other players for a few seconds, allowing him to choose the best path to the basket. Without those few seconds captured in memory, he would forget where each player is as his attention shifts. This visual short-term memory is like a "buffer" in a computer, allowing you to retain important pieces of information that will inform your future actions —whether it is on the basketball court,...

2012-05-09 19:41:46

Ongoing research by a Baylor College of Medicine pediatric oncologist to understand how special cells called natural killer T (NKT) cells can be used to suppress neuroblastoma tumor growth has led to the discovery that the protein IL-15 is key to protecting the NKT cells' anti-tumor effectiveness in a hostile environment. The study, led by Dr. Leonid Metelitsa, associate professor of pediatrics — hematology/oncology at BCM and Texas Children's Cancer Center, appears in the current...

2012-05-09 19:39:51

The deletion of part of a gene that plays a role in the synthesis of carnitine — an amino acid derivative that helps the body use fat for energy — may play a role in milder forms of autism, said a group of researchers led by those at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. "This is a novel inborn error of metabolism," said Dr. Arthur Beaudet, chair of molecular and human genetics at BCM and a physician at Texas Children's Hospital, and the senior author of the...

2012-05-09 19:25:50

When collaborators led by those at Baylor College of Medicine and Stanford University School of Medicine sought to unravel the mysterious role of the enzyme SIRT7 in the cell, they discovered a saboteur that uses other molecules to maintain tumor cells in their cancer state, suppressing the systems that are supposed to prevent that malignant transformation. A report on their work appears online today in the journal Nature. "This is a very bad gene," said Dr. Wei Li, associate professor in...

2012-05-07 20:22:05

The deletion of part of a gene that plays a role in the synthesis of carnitine — an amino acid derivative that helps the body use fat for energy — may play a role in milder forms of autism, said a group of researchers led by those at Baylor College of Medicine (http://www.bcm.edu) and Texas Children's Hospital (http://www.texaschildrens.org). "This is a novel inborn error of metabolism," said Dr. Arthur Beaudet (http://www.bcm.edu/genetics/index.cfm?pmid=10579), chair of...

2012-05-01 21:29:22

The candy bar you swallowed right before jumping on your bicycle keeps you going only so long before the muscles in your legs and hips reach for something with more power — the long chain fatty acids stored to keep you moving for hours. In a report in the journal Cell Metabolism, Dr. Bert O'Malley, professor and chair of molecular and cellular biology at Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Brian York, assistant professor in the same department, and colleagues at BCM describe how a...

2012-05-01 21:27:57

A team of researchers from the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine recently received Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program awards to study new therapeutic targets based on the genomic changes that drive tumor formation. The two awards for the partnering principle investigators total $781,455; and were given to BCM young investigator Dr. Xiaosong Wang, assistant professor in the Smith Breast Center, and Dr. Rachel Schiff, associate professor in...

2012-05-01 20:52:54

A transcription factor activated by too much sugar in the blood is a driver of an implacable cycle of too little insulin resulting in too much sugar in the blood that, in turn, causes failure of beta cells to make enough insulin which results in even higher blood sugar and type 2 diabetes, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in an online report in the journal Diabetologia. That transcription factor — carbohydrate response element binding protein or ChREBP — offers...

2012-04-26 22:26:38

In the spring of 2010, Baylor College of Medicine's Dr. Brendan Lee received a desperate email from the mother of one of his patients. The teen — who had been Lee's patient for most of his life — was in hypertensive crisis and none of the usual treatments could bring his blood pressure down to normal. His heart was enlarged and not pumping well — a problem called cardiomyopathy that was the result of more than a decade of difficult-to-control high blood pressure....


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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