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Latest Bees Stories

60a7d2ecefc47453afadf50a9c9b3e8b1
2011-03-03 07:44:59

Beekeepers in Australia called on the government this week to accelerate efforts to eradicate the devastating Asian honeybee while it still has a chance. The aggressive bees were first detected in far north Queensland about four years ago, and have the potential to wipe out the entire industry. Known as Apis cerana, the Asian honeybees also attack birds, raising concern for local fauna.  They could be as bad a pest as the cane toad, warned Australian Senator Christine Milne on...

2011-01-12 09:15:00

SUNRISE, Fla., Jan. 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- NaturaNectar LLC is pleased to announce that its exclusive extracts from Brazilian Bee Propolis will be featured in an upcoming segment of "The Art of Living with Marilu Henner". The company's EaseFemin(TM) Menopausal Support has been recognized as an effective natural alternative to managing menopausal symptoms and could provide relief for the 40 million plus women currently going through menopause in the US. (Logo:...

2010-08-31 21:05:36

Bee I.D. study will help scientists research biodiversity A York University doctoral student who discovered a new species of bee on his way to the lab one morning has completed a study that examines 84 species of sweat bees in Canada. Nineteen of these species "“ including the one Jason Gibbs found in downtown Toronto ∴ are new to science because they have never been identified or described before. Gibbs' expansive study will help scientists track bee...

647a7d0b00e87e3423baa7f038f9fc51
2010-08-05 08:23:38

Beautiful wildflowers might someday be planted in "bee pastures," floral havens created as an efficient, practical, environmentally friendly, and economically sound way to produce successive generations of healthy young bees. The pesticide-free pastures could be simple to establish, and"”at perhaps only a half-acre each"”easy to tend, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist James H. Cane. He's based at the Pollinating Insects Biology, Management, and...

06ac7c97f1602522d5425bd6cfe141f61
2010-05-27 07:15:00

Blue-green orchid bees zip through increasingly scarce patches of tropical forest pollinating rare flowers. For the first time, researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute track unique signals from tiny transmitters glued to individual orchid bees, yielding new insight into the role of bees in tropical forest ecosystems. "When people disturb and destroy tropical forest they disrupt pollination systems," said David Roubik, senior staff scientist at STRI. "Now we can track orchid...

fe5737dd8a91d769fe4313182a632488
2010-05-04 12:10:00

Scientists from the US, Turkey, Switzerland and Iran describe the nest of an uncommon solitary bee In a rare coincidence, researchers working in both Turkey and Iran discovered on the same day how a rare species of bee builds its underground nests. The females from the solitary species Osima (Ozbekosima) avoseta line the nest's brood chambers with petals of pink, yellow, blue, and purple flowers. The chambers provide nutrients for the larvae to grow and mature and protect the next generation...

2010-04-14 15:09:00

ATLANTA, April 14 /PRNewswire/ -- David J. Nape, President & CEO of Centris Consulting, a world class leader in Operations Management, is pleased to announce the opening of Centris' Atlanta office located at 3003 Summit Boulevard, NE, Suite 1500, Atlanta, Georgia 30319, (404) 560-5090. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20100414/PH86742 ) The office will be headed by Leonard J. "Jodie" Cox, Executive Vice President for Military and Private Sector Services. Mr. Cox, who began...

e9adc19eb586b99d3e9257b1adc53733
2010-03-05 09:00:00

Recent years have seen an unusual rise in the number of bees about in the cold winter months, and scientists are now beginning to find out why. While most bees are hibernating, the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, is out taking advantage of exotic winter-flowering plants in our gardens and parks, according to scientists from Queen Mary, University of London. The study, published in the journal PLoS One, suggests this unique species raises an extra generation of workers to collect...

3f7e7dde4b81ce7cd5688e16ba544dd01
2009-12-24 12:30:59

Honey bees undergo a sudden transition from speeding aircraft to hovering helicopter as they perform the delicate art of landing on a flower. Unlike the "Ëœcontrolled crash' of a fly landing, the bee lands with utmost delicacy after "Ëœreading' its airspeed visually, hovering above its landing ground and sensing it with vision, feelers and legs. Scientists worldwide have devoted decades to studying how honeybees navigate their way around the landscape but now a team from...

2009-12-23 15:55:00

Landing is tricky: hit the ground too fast and you will crash and burn; too slow and you may stall and fall. Bees manage their approach by monitoring the speed of images moving across their eyes. By slowing so that the speed of the looming landing pad's image on the retina remains constant, bees manage to control their approach. But what happens in the final few moments before touch down? And how do bees adapt to landing on surfaces ranging from the horizontal to upside-down ceilings? Flies...


Latest Bees Reference Libraries

Melissophobia
2013-12-24 11:13:46

Melissophobia or the fear of bees, from Greek melissa, meaning honey bee and phobos, meaning fear, and sometimes misspelled as melissaphobia and known also as apiphobia, is one of the most common fears among people and is kind of a specific phobia. The majority of the population have been stung by a bee or had friends or family members stung. A child may fall victim to a bee sting while playing outside. The sting can be rather painful and in some individuals results in swelling which might...

Apiology
2012-10-15 16:00:21

Apiology is the scientific study of honey bees, a subdiscipline of melittology (the study of all bees), which is a subdiscipline of entomology. Melittology comprises of more than 17,000 species other than the honey bee. Apiology includes apicology, which is the study of honey bee ecology. Honey bees are often chosen as a study group to answer questions on the evolution of social systems. People who study honey bees are called apiologists. There have been a number of notable apiologists...

0_883369ca3027116bc769a5aa2feb2314
2005-09-09 09:43:40

The bumblebee is a flying insect of the genus Bombus in the family Apidae and a relative of the common honeybee. The bumblebee feeds on nectar and gathers pollen to feed its young. They are beneficial to humans and the plant world alike, and tend to be larger than other members of the bee family. Most bumblebee species are gentle. From this comes their original name: "Humblebee". Bumblebees are social insects that are known for their black and yellow striped bodies, a commonality among the...

40_f6297e69642d0b18cb59955b1b7675d1
2005-09-09 07:53:35

PHOTO CAPTION: Megachile centuncularis (L.) a European leaf-cutter bee, cutting a Wisteria leaf. Photo taken by Keith Edkins The Megachilidae are a family of mainly solitary bees. They carry pollen in specialized structures called scopae. These scopae are located under the abdomen, rather than on the hind legs like in the honey bee. Megachilidae are commonly known as mason and leaf cutter bees, reflecting the materials they build their nest cells from, such as clay or leaves. Most species...

40_6540b9c32c6bd895500eb3d73b9e6a26
2005-09-08 12:32:32

Carpenter bees (Xylocopinae subfamily) are considered to be important pollinators, especially of open-faced flowers, though they are also known to "rob" nectar by boring holes in the sides of flowers with deep corollas (thus not accomplishing pollination). The smaller species tunnel into pithy stems to build their nests. Other species bore holes in wood and can become pests in wood construction. Carpenter bees are often mistaken for bumblebees. They are similar in size and coloring. The...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.