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Latest Behavioral neuroscience Stories

2012-03-28 08:41:47

Almost all non-human mammals eat placenta for good reasons. Are we missing something? A paper by neuroscientists at the University at Buffalo and Buffalo State College suggests that ingestion of components of afterbirth or placenta -- placentophagia -- may offer benefits to human mothers and perhaps to non-mothers and males. They say this possibility does not warrant the wholesale ingestion of afterbirth, for some very good reasons, but that it deserves further study. Mark Kristal,...

2011-12-20 18:09:12

TAU study finds anxiety-ridden individuals are less sensitive to their environments Anxious people have long been classified as "hypersensitive" – they're thought to be more fearful and feel threatened more easily than their counterparts. But new research from Tel Aviv University shows that the anxious may not be hypersensitive at all – in fact, they may not be sensitive enough. As part of a study on how the brain processes fear in anxious and non-anxious individuals, Tahl...

2011-10-05 19:30:11

Research gives insight into 50-year-old mystery -- zinc important for learning and memory Zinc plays a critical role in regulating how neurons communicate with one another, and could affect how memories form and how we learn. The new research, in the current issue of Neuron, was authored by Xiao-an Zhang, now a chemistry professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC), and colleagues at MIT and Duke University. Researchers have been trying to pin down the role of zinc in the...

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2011-07-20 10:35:55

Players of the game "rock, paper, scissors" unknowingly mimic one another's hand shapes, increasing the chance of the game ending in a draw, according to new research published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B this week. The study shows that even when players lose out by drawing a game, they can't help themselves from copying the hand gestures of their opponent. The result is surprising because advantage is gained in the game by acting differently. Usually when chance is...

2011-04-12 11:26:10

U-M study finds variations in gene linked to higher risk of alcohol symptoms, more impulsiveness, greater brain activity Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System have uncovered a new link between genetic variations associated with alcoholism, impulsive behavior and a region of the brain involved in craving and anxiety. The results, published online April 12 in Molecular Psychiatry, suggest that variations in the GABRA2 gene contribute to the risk of alcoholism by influencing...

2011-03-21 13:10:52

You may remember the color of your loved one's eyes for years. But how? Scientists believe that long-term potentiation (LTP) "“ the long-lasting increase of signals across a connection between brain cells -- underlies our ability to remember over time and to learn, but how that happens is a central question in neuroscience. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have found a cascade of signaling molecules that allows a usually very brief signal to last for tens of minutes,...

2010-10-19 09:34:00

ZURICH, Oct. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- The Jacobs Foundation, one of the largest foundations in Europe in the field of youth development in terms of resources and financial commitments, today announced Professors Terrie Moffitt and Avshalom Caspi as the recipients of the second annual Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize of one million USD for their trailblazing discoveries of how specific genes, along with environmental factors, are predictors of how childhood stress will impact individuals in...

2010-08-09 17:45:44

UCLA researchers identify brain pathways linking social stress and inflammation Everyone experiences social stress, whether it is nervousness over a job interview, difficulty meeting people at parties, or angst over giving a speech. In a new report, UCLA researchers have discovered that how your brain responds to social stressors can influence the body's immune system in ways that may negatively affect health. Lead author George Slavich, a postdoctoral fellow at the UCLA Cousins Center for...

2010-07-28 13:02:50

You hear it all the time in museums and art galleries: "I don't know much about art, but I know what I like." As a corollary, neuroscience researchers at Baylor College of Medicine add that money, even if only tangentially related, can influence that opinion. On a more global platform, value judgments of this sort can be altered by such influences or favors, said Dr. P. Read Montague, professor of neuroscience at BCM and the senior author of a report evaluating the effect of a payment on art...


Latest Behavioral neuroscience Reference Libraries

Biological Psychiatry
2012-06-04 19:30:28

Biological Psychiatry is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1969 and published twice monthly (1st and 15th) by Elsevier since 1985. It is the official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry. The journal also publishes an annual supplement which contains the abstracts from the annual meeting of the Society. The founding editor-in-chief was Joseph Wortis, who edited the journal from 1969 to 1992. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is John H. Krystal (Chair of the...

Genes, Brain and Behavior
2012-04-29 19:42:56

Genes, Brain and Behavior (G2B) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 2002. It is published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International Behavioral and Neural Genetics Society. It was published on a quarterly basis during its first year in publication. In 2003, the journal switched to bimonthly publications, and then in 2006 it switched to an 8-issue-per-year schedule. Content from G2B is available online from the Wiley Online Library or, from EBSCOhost after 12 months....

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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