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Latest Behavioral neuroscience Stories

2010-06-29 07:59:17

TAU's brain-to-computer chip revolutionizes neurological therapy By stimulating certain areas of the brain, scientists can alleviate the effects of disorders such as depression or Parkinson's disease. That's the good news. But because controlling that stimulation currently lacks precision, over-stimulation is a serious concern "” losing some of its therapeutic benefits for the patient over time. Now a Tel Aviv University team, part of a European consortium, is delving deep into human...

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2010-05-17 07:09:09

Targeting gene regulator in brain reward circuit eyed as treatment Scientists have discovered a mechanism that helps to explain resilience to stress, vulnerability to depression and how antidepressants work. The new findings, in the reward circuit of mouse and human brains, have spurred a high tech dragnet for compounds that boost the action of a key gene regulator there, called deltaFosB. A molecular main power switch "“ called a transcription factor "“ inside neurons, deltaFosB...

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2010-02-24 15:59:52

Researchers develop novel strategy to probe 'genetic haystack' In ongoing work to identify how genes interact with social environments to impact human health, UCLA researchers have discovered what they describe as a biochemical link between misery and death. In addition, they found a specific genetic variation in some individuals that seems to disconnect that link, rendering them more biologically resilient in the face of adversity. Perhaps most important to science in the long term,...

2010-01-14 20:27:32

Mice and humans with same human gene abnormality behave similarly according to study in journal Science Studying animals in behavioral experiments has been a cornerstone of psychological research, but whether the observations are relevant for human behavior has been unclear. Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have identified an alteration to the DNA of a gene that imparts similar anxiety-related behavior in both humans and mice, demonstrating that laboratory animals can be accurately...

2009-09-10 07:00:45

New research with mice has provided some fascinating insight into how addictive drugs hijack reward signals and influence neural processes associated with learning and memory. The research, published by Cell Press in the September 10th issue of the journal Neuron, helps to explain why and how drug-associated memories, such as the place of drug use, drive and perpetuate the addiction. The neurochemical dopamine, a key player in the brain's reward system, is known to be involved in the process...

2009-08-26 14:04:13

U.S. researchers say they've found short- and long-term memories in the fruit fly come from one gene activating different groups of neurons. Researchers at Cold Springs Harbor Laboratory and Stony Brook University say their discovery challenges the theory that short- and long-term memories result from changes in the same group of neurons. They found distinct groups of neurons are simultaneously activated when fruit flies learn a task. Rapid, short-lived activation in one group of neurons,...

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2009-07-13 10:55:00

New study helps explain why it is easy to encode new memories but hard to hold onto themMemories aren't made of actin filaments. But their assembly is crucial for long-term potentiation (LTP), an increase in synapse sensitivity that researchers think helps to lay down memories. In the July 13, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org), Rex et al. reveal that LTP's actin reorganization occurs in two stages that are controlled by different pathways, a discovery that helps explain...

2008-10-07 00:00:34

By Sharon Jayson A new study from researchers in Utah finds that a warm touch -- the non-sexual, supportive kind -- tempers stress and blood pressure, adding to a growing body of research on how emotions affect health. The study of 34 young married couples ages 20 to 39 conducted by researchers at Brigham Young University in Provo and the University of Utah in Salt Lake City found that massage and other supportive and caring touch lowers stress hormones and blood pressure, particularly...

2007-04-26 12:12:15

A U.S. study has found morphine blocks the brain's ability to strengthen inhibitory synapse connections -- an important finding for addiction therapy. Brown University Professor Julie Kauer and colleagues found as little as a single dose of morphine could contribute to addiction. The study also supports a theory that addiction is a disease of learning and memory. In the study, the researchers found long-term potentiation, or LTP, is blocked in the brains of rats given as little as a...

2005-11-23 11:35:00

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK -- The holidays are fast approaching. You're stressed, trying to diet and tempting foods abound. It's a recipe for overeating, according to researchers who found that when rats are stressed, deprived of food and then exposed to chocolate -- they overeat. "Our findings contribute to the understanding of how feeding behavior is regulated," Dr. M. Flavia Barbano from the Universite Victor Segalen, Bordeaux 2 in France told Reuters Health. "Research in this field could...


Latest Behavioral neuroscience Reference Libraries

Biological Psychiatry
2012-06-04 19:30:28

Biological Psychiatry is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1969 and published twice monthly (1st and 15th) by Elsevier since 1985. It is the official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry. The journal also publishes an annual supplement which contains the abstracts from the annual meeting of the Society. The founding editor-in-chief was Joseph Wortis, who edited the journal from 1969 to 1992. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is John H. Krystal (Chair of the...

Genes, Brain and Behavior
2012-04-29 19:42:56

Genes, Brain and Behavior (G2B) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 2002. It is published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International Behavioral and Neural Genetics Society. It was published on a quarterly basis during its first year in publication. In 2003, the journal switched to bimonthly publications, and then in 2006 it switched to an 8-issue-per-year schedule. Content from G2B is available online from the Wiley Online Library or, from EBSCOhost after 12 months....

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.