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Latest Beringia Stories

Most Complete Ancient Skeleton From New World Sheds New Light On Human Migration
2014-05-16 07:33:27

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of scientists have uncovered the most genetically complete human skeleton from the New World yet, dating back more than 12,000 years. The skeleton, discovered in an underwater cave system in the Yucatan Peninsula, is that of a 12-year-old girl who fell into the once dry open pit, breaking her pelvis and likely killing her instantly from the 190-foot fall, according to researchers. Now, the team, a body of...

New Analysis Reveals Relationship Between Siberian And North American Languages
2014-03-13 08:51:04

PLOS Evolutionary analysis applied to the relationship between North American and Central Siberian languages may indicate that people moved out from the Bering Land Bridge, with some migrating back to central Asia and others into North America, according to a paper published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 12, 2014 by Mark Sicoli, from Georgetown University and Gary Holton from University of Alaska Fairbanks. Languages evolve slowly overtime and may even follow human...

Bering Land Bridge Was Home To Early Natives For 10,000 Years: Study
2014-02-28 09:47:53

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After the ancestors of modern day Native Americans left Asia, they spent approximately 10,000 years living in the shrubby lowlands of the Bering land bridge, according to genetic and environmental evidence. There is no available archaeological evidence, however, because it drowned beneath the Bering Sea when the sea levels rose about 18,000 years ago. Dennis O'Rourke, a University of Utah anthropologist, worked with archaeologist...

Picky Eating Was Critical In Saber-Tooth Tiger Extinction
2013-05-09 08:46:34

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During the Pleistocene epoch, an astounding diversity of large-bodied mammals inhabited the so-called “mammoth steppe” — a cold and dry, yet productive, environment that extended from western Europe through northern Asia and across the Bering land bridge to the Yukon territory. Three types of large predators roamed the steppe during the Pleistocene, wolves, bears and large cats. After the end of the last ice age, only...

Native Americans, Northern Europeans Genetically Related
2012-12-01 11:17:42

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Northern European populations - including British, Scandinavians, French and some Eastern Europeans - descend from a mixture of two very different ancestral populations a new study finds, and one of these populations is related to Native Americans. The results of this study, published in the November issue of the Genetics Society of America's journal GENETICS, help fill in the gaps in scientific understanding of both Native...

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2012-07-12 12:47:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The largest survey of Native American DNA ever conducted has revealed that people settled the New World in three distinct waves, not one as previously believed, various media outlets reported Wednesday. According to Robert Lee Hotz of the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Medical School Geneticist David Reich and an international team of colleagues compared thousands of genetic variations among 52 contemporary Native American...

Deglaciation Data Opens Door For Earlier First Americans Migration
2012-06-25 04:06:21

A new study of lake sediment cores from Sanak Island in the western Gulf of Alaska suggests that deglaciation there from the last Ice Age took place as much as 1,500 to 2,000 years earlier than previously thought, opening the door for earlier coastal migration models for the Americas. The Sanak Island Biocomplexity Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, also concluded that the maximum thickness of the ice sheet in the Sanak Island region during the last glacial maximum was 70...

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2011-02-25 06:15:00

The oldest human remains ever discovered in sub-Arctic North America have been unearthed in a newly excavated archaeological site in Alaska, scientists said on Thursday. The skeletal remains appear to be those of a 3-year-old child buried some 11,500 years ago, and could provide rare insight into the burial practices of Ice Age peoples and the lives of early settlers who crossed from Asia to the New World, the scientists said. The remains were discovered in an ancient fire pit within an...

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2010-07-24 06:07:02

Researchers say that a scientific reconstruction of one of the oldest sets of human remains found in the Americas supports theories that the first people who came to the hemisphere migrated from a broader area than once thought. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History released photos on Thursday of the reconstructed image of a woman who probably lived on Mexico's Caribbean coast 10,000 to 12,000 years ago.  Anthropologist have believed for a while that humans migrated...

2010-06-30 12:30:33

The initial peopling of North America from Asia occurred approximately 15,000-18,000 years ago, however estimations of the genetic diversity of the first settlers have remained inaccurate. In a report published June 29 in Genome Research, researchers have found that the diversity of the first Americans has been significantly underestimated, underscoring the importance of comprehensive sampling for accurate analysis of human migrations. Substantial evidence suggests that humans first crossed...


Latest Beringia Reference Libraries

Steppe Wisent, Bison priscus
2012-05-10 05:08:05

The steppe wisent (Bison priscus) or steppe bison was common to North America, Central Asia, Europe, and Beringia during the Quaternary period. It is thought that the steppe bison appeared around the same time as the aurochs , an extinct type of cattle, in Asia. Descendants of the steppe bison are often confused with the aurochs species. During the late Pleistocene era, the steppe wisent became extinct, giving rise to the modern wisent in Europe, and eventually the modern Bison in America....

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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