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Latest Beta cell Stories

2011-10-17 16:30:00

Scientists may someday be able to develop therapies that target this pathway to treat or prevent a variety of diseases, including diabetes as reported by DiabeticLive.com. Orlando, FL (PRWEB) October 17, 2011 For those who have diabetes, there is hope for new treatments and possible a cure. A new molecular pathway related to the regeneration of beta cells in the pancreas has been discovered by a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Scientists may someday be...

2011-10-12 23:15:46

By manipulating a well-known molecular pathway, JDRF-funded scientists breathe new life into aging beta cells As a person ages, the ability of their beta cells to divide and make new beta cells declines. By the time children reach the age of 10 to 12 years, the ability of their insulin-producing cells to replicate greatly diminishes. If these cells, called beta cells, are destroyed–as they are in type 1 diabetes–treatment with the hormone insulin becomes essential to regulate...

2011-10-12 23:13:14

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a key molecular pathway responsible for the natural decrease in the proliferation of insulin-producing cells that occurs as a person ages. Artificially activating this pathway, which is normally not functional in adults, may be a new way to combat diabetes. "We're hopeful that soon we might be able to manipulate this pathway in a therapeutic way in humans," said professor of developmental biology Seung Kim, MD, PhD,...

2011-10-11 05:52:12

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are some genes we wish would not fit.  Ten years of mouse breeding, screening, and record-keeping have finally paid off for Alan Attie and his lab members.  A recent study has pinpointed a gene that gives diabetes susceptibility in obese mice. They also showed that the protein coded by the gene, called tomosyn-2, acts as a brake on insulin secretion from the pancreas. "It's too early for us to know how relevant this gene will be to human diabetes,"...

2011-10-11 05:51:16

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Time to start harvesting your own stem cells! A recent study shows that a new treatment for diabetes uses patients' own stem cells can overcome a shortage of insulin-producing cells without the need for gene transfer. Diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin production by the pancreas and affects more than 200 million people worldwide. There is currently no cure, leaving patients to rely on external supplies of insulin or treatments to alter levels of blood glucose....

2011-10-10 07:00:00

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a gene that may be responsible for determining an individual's susceptibility to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, as reported by DiabeticLive.com. Orlando, FL (PRWEB) October 10, 2011 Researchers Discover New Gene that Encodes for Diabetes Resistance: Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a gene that may be responsible for determining an individual's susceptibility to both Type 1 and Type 2...

2011-10-07 11:00:07

Using patients' own stem cells can overcome shortage of insulin-producing cells without the need for gene transfer Researchers in Japan have discovered how a patient's neural stem cells could be used as an alternative source of the beta cells needed for a regenerative treatment for diabetes. The research, published in EMBO Molecular Medicine today, reveals how harvesting stem cells could overcome a lack of beta cell transplants from donors. Diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin...

2011-09-14 07:00:00

Most people don't know, however, that Lily was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of three, and that her diabetes requires her to carefully manage her meals, her blood sugar levels, and her daily insulin injections as reported by diabeticlive.com. Tampa, FL (PRWEB) September 14, 2011 Amelia Lily, X-Factor Contestant, Discusses Her Type 1 Diabetes: Amelia Lily, a competitor on the British singing talent show X-Factor, recently received glowing praise from the judges for her rendition...

2011-09-12 14:17:33

Say Hebrew University researchers Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have identified the key signal that prompts production of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas -- a breakthrough discovery that may ultimately help researchers find ways to restore or increase beta cell function in people with type 1 diabetes. The work on the multi-year project was led by Prof. Yuval Dor of the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada of the Hebrew University, researchers...

2011-09-07 12:33:30

Mysterious mesenchyme is key piece of pancreatic puzzle A somewhat mysterious soft tissue found in the fetus during early development in the womb plays a pivotal role in the formation of mature beta cells the sole source of the body's insulin. This discovery, made by scientists at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Texas A&M University, may lead to new ways of addressing Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. As reported today in the journal PLoS Biology, during the late stages...


Latest Beta cell Reference Libraries

0_0d961f30bdfa64859d9b869b063ddcd2
2010-12-03 18:12:26

Insulin, a hormone, is used to regulate carbohydrate and fat metabolism in the body. Insulin causes cells to take up glucose from the blood and store it as glycogen in the liver and muscle. This hormone stops the body from using fat as an energy source by inhibiting the release of glucagons. Without insulin the body fails to take glucose into the bodies cells and in turns uses fat as an energy source. It also has several other anabolic effects throughout the body. Diabetes mellitus results...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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