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Latest Betel Stories

2006-04-05 07:50:00

By Lee Chyen Yee TAOYUAN, Taiwan -- It tastes bitter, turns your teeth black and causes cancer, but it also gives you a buzz and is served by scantily clad young women. And that is why it is proving hard for Taiwan's government to get its heavy betel nut chewers, mostly blue-collar workers, to kick the habit despite the widely known health risks and the red stains left on the sidewalks where users spit out the juice. Truck drivers in Taiwan, like their counterparts in China, India, Indonesia...

2005-12-14 16:23:20

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Betel quid chewing is a strong independent risk factor for pharyngeal cancer (cancer of the back of the throat), but not laryngeal cancer (cancer of the voice box), according to findings published in the International Journal of Cancer. Chewing betel quid, which consists of betel leaf from the Piper betle vine, is popular in many parts of Asia. Betel quid is chewed for its stimulant effects, to satisfy hunger and as a social and cultural practice. "The...

2005-09-26 08:35:00

CHANG SON, Vietnam -- The water puppet performers rub crushed ginger onto their skin and drink fish sauce to keep warm when they stand waist deep in cold rice paddies and ponds. Practitioners of the 900-year-old art in Vietnam's northern Red River Delta endure discomforts for love of their craft. But the few surviving traditionalist water puppetry troupes struggle to keep afloat. They lack money and personnel while two professional indoor theaters thrive in the capital, Hanoi. "If they didn't...

2005-09-26 07:30:00

By Grant McCool CHANG SON, Vietnam (Reuters) - The water puppet performers rub crushed ginger onto their skin and drink fish sauce to keep warm when they stand waist deep in cold rice paddies and ponds. Practitioners of the 900-year-old art in Vietnam's northern Red River Delta endure discomforts for love of their craft. But the few surviving traditionalist water puppetry troupes struggle to keep afloat. They lack money and personnel while two professional indoor theaters thrive in the...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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