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Latest Bibliography for Harold Pinter Stories

2008-12-26 10:36:13

Irish actor Michael Gambon has called British playwright Harold Pinter, who died of cancer this week, a god for actors. Pinter penned dozens of plays including The Caretaker and The Birthday Party, as well as scripts for the films The French Lieutenant's Woman and Sleuth. He died Wednesday at the age of 78. Gambon, who is best known for playing Albus Dumbledore in the three most recent Harry Potter films, has appeared in numerous Pinter plays throughout his career. He is scheduled to star in...

2008-09-08 15:00:42

By Aurelio Sanchez Journal Staff Writer Nobel Prize-winning British playwright Harold Pinter is a master at taking common familial themes like power, love, hate and jealousy, and then metaphorically extending them to entire countries. Take, for example, the love-hate relationship between Great Britain and America: England the reluctant progenitor and America the ungrateful progeny; England's class-structured snobbery versus America's mythical self-determination; England's post-traumatic...

2005-10-13 08:41:06

By Stephen Brown STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - British playwright Harold Pinter, a master of sparse dialogue and menacing silences who has been an outspoken critic of the U.S.-led war in Iraq, was the surprise winner of the Nobel literature prize on Thursday. The 75-year-old Londoner, son of a Jewish dressmaker, is one of Britain's best-known dramatists for plays like "The Birthday Party" and "The Caretaker," whose mundane dialogue with sinister undercurrents gave rise to the adjective...

2005-10-13 06:04:44

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - British playwright Harold Pinter won the Nobel Prize in Literature for 2005 on Thursday. Pinter "uncovers the precipice under everyday prattle and forces entry into oppression's closed rooms," said the Swedish Academy's citation for the 10 million crown prize.


Word of the Day
barghest
  • A goblin in English folklore, often appearing in the shape of a large dog and believed to portend imminent death or misfortune.
  • A ghost, wraith, hobgoblin, elf, or spirit.
The origin of 'barghest' is not known, but it may be from perhaps burh-ghest, town-ghost, or German Berg-geist (mountain spirit) or Bär-geist (bear-spirit).
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