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Latest Bioaccumulation Stories

2014-02-19 11:05:43

A Dartmouth-University of Connecticut study of the northeast United States shows that methylmercury concentrations in estuary waters -- not in sediment as commonly thought -- are the best way to predict mercury contamination in the marine food chain. The findings raise questions about current mercury cleanup practices, and shed new light on the different ways in which the toxic metal bioaccumulates in aquatic species, from bottom-dwelling worms to forage fish to larger fish consumed by...

2013-10-04 13:11:49

Dartmouth, other researchers report global warming may boost fishes' metabolism and accumulation of toxic metal Rising ocean surface temperatures caused by climate change could make fish accumulate more mercury, increasing the health risk to people who eat seafood, Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues report in a study in the journal PLOS ONE. Until now, little has been known about how global warming may affect mercury bioaccumulation in marine life, and no previous study has...

2013-09-13 10:17:37

Microbes that live in rice paddies, northern peat bogs and other previously unexpected environments are among the bacteria that can generate highly toxic methylmercury, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center have learned. This finding, published in Environmental Science and Technology, explains why deadly methylated mercury is produced in areas where the neurotoxin’s presence has puzzled researchers for decades. Methylmercury —...

Mercury In Pacific Fish On The Rise
2013-08-26 05:30:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The amount of toxic mercury found in Pacific Ocean fish is expected to increase over the next several decades, claims new research appearing in the August 25 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience. Using recently-developed isotopic measurement techniques, researchers from the University of Michigan and the University of Hawaii reported that they have discovered how methylmercury gets into open-ocean fish, thus infecting the...

2011-11-09 15:56:40

Scientists are reporting development of a fast, reliable new test that could help people avoid a terrible type of food poisoning that comes from eating fish tainted with a difficult-to-detect toxin from marine algae growing in warm waters. The report appears in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry. Takeshi Yasumoto and colleagues explain that 20,000-60,000 people every year come down with ciguatera poisoning from eating fish tainted with a ciguatoxin -- the most common source of food...

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2011-04-19 07:09:45

Feathers collected from the rare Pacific black-footed albatross over the past 120 years have helped researchers from Harvard University track increases in the neurotoxin methylmercury in the endangered bird, which forages extensively throughout the Pacific, reports AFP. Scientists took the feather samples from two US museum collections -- the Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology and the University of Washington Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. Studies of the feathers...

2011-03-31 13:07:39

In the first report on the uptake and internal processing of triclocarban (TCC) in fish, scientists today reported strong evidence that TCC "” an antibacterial ingredient in some soaps and the source of environmental health concerns because of its potential endocrine-disrupting effects "” has a "strong" tendency to bioaccumulate in fish. They presented the findings here today at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. Bioaccumulation occurs...

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2009-12-09 10:55:00

With growing concerns about the effects of global warming on polar bears, it's increasingly important to understand how other environmental threats, such as mercury pollution, are affecting these magnificent Arctic animals. New research led by biogeochemists Travis Horton of the University of Canterbury and Joel Blum of the University of Michigan lays the groundwork for assessing current and future effects of mercury deposition and climate change on polar bears. The study appears in the...

2008-10-20 21:00:14

Belgian scientists say they've found methylmercury, the main form of mercury found in the blood of marine mammals, might do more harm to seals than thought. Researchers led by Krishna Das of the University of Liege determined methylmercury, or MeHg, harms T-lymphocytes -- key cells in a seal's immune system. Similar results were also found for human lymphocytes. The researchers noted mercury exposure occurs both as a result of man-made pollution, as well as by natural events such as...

2008-09-22 12:00:14

U.S. scientists have discovered synthetic carbon molecules called fullerenes, or buckyballs, can accumulated in animal tissue, but break down in sunlight. Purdue University researchers who made the discovery said it's important to know how buckyballs function since they might see widespread use in such applications such as drug-delivery vehicles for cancer therapy, military armor or as chemical sensors. "Because of the numerous potential applications, it is important to learn how...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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