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Latest Biodiversity Stories

A Biodiversity Hotspot Of Amphibians And Reptiles Discovered In Peru
2014-02-20 13:32:29

[ Watch the Video: Tracking Biodiversity in a Global Hotspot ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Biologists from several universities say Peru’s Manu National Park is the world’s top biodiversity hotspot for reptiles and amphibians. Manu National Park includes the lowland Amazonian rain forest, a high-altitude cloud forest and an Andean grassland east of Cuzco. It was designated as a UNESCO Biosphere Preserve in 1977 and a World Heritage Site in 1987. The...

Eurasian Beaver Diversity In Question
2014-02-19 09:53:51

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Long-prized for their thick fur, the cuddly Eurasian beaver has been hunted by humans for thousands of years and a new genetic study from a large group of international researchers has found that predation by humans has significantly cut down the genetic diversity of these animals. “While beaver populations have been growing rapidly since the late 19th century when conservation efforts began, genetic diversity within modern beaver...

Conserving Potato Agrobiodiversity
2014-02-17 13:48:02

Penn State Mashed, smashed and fried, Americans love potatoes, but only a few varieties are grown in much of North American agriculture. In South America, where potatoes originated, more than 5,000 varieties continue to exist. A Penn State geographer is gathering all the information he can about the agrobiodiversity of these uniquely adapted tubers with an eye toward sustainability of this fourth largest food crop worldwide. "In the U.S. we rely primarily on 10 to 12 types of potatoes...

Arctic Biome Under Extreme Threat From A Changing Climate
2014-02-14 10:55:40

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Arctic as we know it may not exist as climate change is threatening the polar biome’s unique biodiversity and landscape, according to a new report from a large international team of scientists. Conducted by the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) under the Arctic Council, an international forum of Arctic nations, the new study found that climate change could shrink Arctic ecosystems, as advancing changes move north and...

More Native Biodiversity Supported By Cities Than Previously Thought
2014-02-13 13:44:39

Julie Cohen - University of California - Santa Barbara Researchers at UCSB's NCEAS compile the largest global dataset of urban birds and plants, which shows world's cities retain a unique natural palette The rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity. Yet, according to a new study involving 147 cities worldwide, surprisingly high numbers of plant and animal species persist and even flourish in urban environments — to...

Maps Reveal Expected Redistribution Of Global Species Due To Climate Change
2014-02-11 17:06:51

University of California, Santa Barbara An international team of scientists tracks how fast and in which direction local climates — and species — have shifted As climate change unfolds over the next century, plants and animals will need to adapt or shift locations to follow their ideal climate. A new study provides an innovative global map of where species are likely to succeed or fail in keeping up with a changing climate. The findings appear in the science journal Nature. As...

2014-02-11 11:02:49

Forest management is based on recommendations that are supposed to maximize economic revenues. However, in 40% of cases a better economic result would be achieved by neglecting some of the recommendations. This would also greatly benefit biodiversity. These results were obtained by a research group lead by Professor Mikko Mönkkönen at the University Jyväskylä. The group studied a production forest landscape encompassing 68 square kilometers of land and more than 30,000 forest stands in...

New Maps Show Locations Of Species At Risk As The Climate Changes
2014-02-11 09:22:04

CSIRO In research published today in the journal Nature, CSIRO and an international team of scientists revealed global maps showing how fast and in which direction local climates are shifting. This new study points to a simpler way of looking at climatic changes and their likely effects on biodiversity. As climate change unfolds over the next century, plants and animals will need to adapt or shift locations to track their ideal climate. “The maps show areas where plants and...

2014-02-10 12:22:32

SAN JOSE, Calif., Feb. 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In a desert that was once an ocean, 35 fossilized bodies waited patiently for 250 million years to tell their story. It is the story of quantum speciation, or biodiversity explosion events, that abruptly, and seemingly out of nowhere, filled the earth with a wide range of biodiverse life forms. Biodiversity explosion events have remained one of our greatest planetary mysteries because of the lack of hard evidence as to how they...

2014-02-10 11:12:35

Naturally regrowing woodlands in the subtropics can help to reduce declines in Australia’s reptiles, scientists have proposed. Research at the National Environmental Research Program’s (NERP) Environmental Decisions Hub has found that woodlands in the Australian subtropics can be restored as a haven for native reptiles if cleared areas are left to regrow. In turn, reptiles such as skinks, dragons, and geckos help restore the woodland ecosystems by providing links in the food chain....


Latest Biodiversity Reference Libraries

Heirloom plant
2013-09-20 13:16:15

Heirloom plants are plants that were grown centuries ago, handed down through the generations, and are still grown today without genetic modification. Heirloom plants maintain their traits year after year even though they are subjected to open pollination. Growing heirlooms is becoming more popular in North America and Europe because of their resistance to disease, pests, and extreme weather. Plants that have been genetically altered through artificial means, otherwise known as hybrids,...

Conservation Biology
2012-05-12 20:05:54

Conservation Biology is a peer-reviewed academic journal of the Society for Conservation Biology. It was established in 1987 and is published by Wiley-Blackwell. Conservation Biology was originally developed to provide a global voice for an emerging discipline. It quickly became the most important journal dealing with the topic of biological diversity. Editor-in-chief is Gary Meffe; managing editor is Ellen Main. Stanley A. Temple, President of the SCB from 1991-1993, said: “The...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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