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Latest Biodiversity Stories

Maps Reveal Expected Redistribution Of Global Species Due To Climate Change
2014-02-11 17:06:51

University of California, Santa Barbara An international team of scientists tracks how fast and in which direction local climates — and species — have shifted As climate change unfolds over the next century, plants and animals will need to adapt or shift locations to follow their ideal climate. A new study provides an innovative global map of where species are likely to succeed or fail in keeping up with a changing climate. The findings appear in the science journal Nature. As...

2014-02-11 11:02:49

Forest management is based on recommendations that are supposed to maximize economic revenues. However, in 40% of cases a better economic result would be achieved by neglecting some of the recommendations. This would also greatly benefit biodiversity. These results were obtained by a research group lead by Professor Mikko Mönkkönen at the University Jyväskylä. The group studied a production forest landscape encompassing 68 square kilometers of land and more than 30,000 forest stands in...

New Maps Show Locations Of Species At Risk As The Climate Changes
2014-02-11 09:22:04

CSIRO In research published today in the journal Nature, CSIRO and an international team of scientists revealed global maps showing how fast and in which direction local climates are shifting. This new study points to a simpler way of looking at climatic changes and their likely effects on biodiversity. As climate change unfolds over the next century, plants and animals will need to adapt or shift locations to track their ideal climate. “The maps show areas where plants and...

2014-02-10 12:22:32

SAN JOSE, Calif., Feb. 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In a desert that was once an ocean, 35 fossilized bodies waited patiently for 250 million years to tell their story. It is the story of quantum speciation, or biodiversity explosion events, that abruptly, and seemingly out of nowhere, filled the earth with a wide range of biodiverse life forms. Biodiversity explosion events have remained one of our greatest planetary mysteries because of the lack of hard evidence as to how they...

2014-02-10 11:12:35

Naturally regrowing woodlands in the subtropics can help to reduce declines in Australia’s reptiles, scientists have proposed. Research at the National Environmental Research Program’s (NERP) Environmental Decisions Hub has found that woodlands in the Australian subtropics can be restored as a haven for native reptiles if cleared areas are left to regrow. In turn, reptiles such as skinks, dragons, and geckos help restore the woodland ecosystems by providing links in the food chain....

Microcosm Of Biodiversity In New Plant Species
2014-02-10 10:21:53

Pensoft Publishers Biologists working in the Andes mountains of Ecuador have described a new plant species, a wild relative of black pepper, that is in itself a mini biodiversity hotspot. The new species, Piper kelleyi, is the sole home of an estimated 40-50 insect species, most of which are entirely dependent on this plant species for survival. This discovery is part of a larger project which focuses on the influence of plant-produced chemical compounds on biodiversity. The study was...

Woolly Mammoths And Other Megafauna Suffered From A Loss Of Plant Diversity
2014-02-06 09:29:49

[ Watch the Video: Diet Changes Killed Off Woolly Mammoths ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have put forth many theories on why woolly mammoths and other large animals went extinct around 10,000 years ago, from the devastating effects of a comet impact to overhunting by humans. A new DNA-based study published in the journal Nature has found that the flowering plants these “megafauna” depended on disappeared from northern Asia and North America...

2014-02-04 12:21:21

- He was the first to describe a case of co-evolution - between butterflies and plants - and how it may contrive to generate biological diversity MADRID, Feb. 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The sixth annual BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Ecology and Conservation Biology category goes to entomologist Paul Ehrlich, Professor of Biology at Stanford University (United States), for having "contributed key conceptual advances in the science of ecology and conservation...

2014-02-04 11:43:47

Biodiversity co-benefits and climate change mitigation strategies A team of Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) scientists created maps of habitat corridors connecting protected areas in the tropics to incorporate biodiversity co-benefits into climate change mitigation strategies. Drs. Patrick Jantz, Scott Goetz, and Nadine Laporte describe their findings in an article entitled, "Carbon stock corridors to mitigate climate change and promote biodiversity in the tropics," available online in...

Biodiversity Benefits Greatly From Organic Farming
2014-02-04 10:00:56

[ Watch the Video: Robotic Biodiversity Thrives On Organic Farms ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many people argue that organic farming is better for public health, and a new study from researchers at Oxford University has found that organic farms support greater biodiversity in their immediate environment. The study, being published this week in the Journal of Applied Ecology, traced 30 years of organic farming and found that greater biodiversity compared to...


Latest Biodiversity Reference Libraries

Heirloom plant
2013-09-20 13:16:15

Heirloom plants are plants that were grown centuries ago, handed down through the generations, and are still grown today without genetic modification. Heirloom plants maintain their traits year after year even though they are subjected to open pollination. Growing heirlooms is becoming more popular in North America and Europe because of their resistance to disease, pests, and extreme weather. Plants that have been genetically altered through artificial means, otherwise known as hybrids,...

Conservation Biology
2012-05-12 20:05:54

Conservation Biology is a peer-reviewed academic journal of the Society for Conservation Biology. It was established in 1987 and is published by Wiley-Blackwell. Conservation Biology was originally developed to provide a global voice for an emerging discipline. It quickly became the most important journal dealing with the topic of biological diversity. Editor-in-chief is Gary Meffe; managing editor is Ellen Main. Stanley A. Temple, President of the SCB from 1991-1993, said: “The...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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