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Plants May Be Taking Up More Atmospheric Carbon Than Models

Plants May Be Taking Up More Atmospheric Carbon Than Models Previously Estimated

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research led by scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee has found that global climate change models may have underestimated the amount of carbon dioxide absorption by...

Latest Biogeochemical cycle Stories

stream restoration project in Baltimore
2014-09-10 23:04:46

Urban waters record the salt in our food, cement in our sidewalks, University of Maryland scientist says. (PRWEB) September 10, 2014 Most people think of city landscapes as simpler, diminished versions of the wild forests and free-flowing streams found in remote places. But in a series of studies published Sept. 10, 2014 in a special issue of the journal Biogeochemistry, scientists specializing in urban ecosystems say just the opposite is true. Urban landscapes are more complex than they...

Burrowing Animals May Have Been Key To Stabilizing Earth's Oxygen Reservoir
2014-08-08 03:22:57

University of Southern Denmark Evolution of the first burrowing animals may have played a major role in stabilizing the Earth's oxygen reservoir, according to a new study in Nature Geoscience. Around 540 million years ago, the first burrowing animals evolved. When these worms began to mix up the ocean floor's sediments (a process known as bioturbation), their activity came to significantly influence the ocean's phosphorus cycle and as a result, the amount of oxygen in Earth's...

2014-05-20 12:17:44

University of Montana A new paper co-written by four University of Montana researchers finds that humans have more than doubled tropical nitrogen inputs. Benjamin Sullivan, a researcher working with UM College of Forestry and Conservation Professor Cory Cleveland, led the team that looked at the nitrogen cycle in tropical rain forests. Sullivan and his colleagues used a new method to demonstrate that biological nitrogen fixation in tropical rain forests may be less than a quarter of...

Reimagining How Earth Emerged Out Of Ice Age
2014-03-19 14:15:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers, publishing a paper in the journal Nature, say rapid erosion in mountain regions could explain why the Earth isn’t essentially still a snowball. Scientists have long believed that rocks pushed up to the surface by plate tectonics absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide, and volcanic processes are what helps to emit this CO2. However, despite this theory and a variety of other hypotheses being put forward to balance the...

How Mountains And Rivers Make Life Possible
2014-03-14 14:47:09

Stanford University Favorable conditions for life on Earth are enabled in part by the natural shuttling of carbon dioxide from the planet's atmosphere to its rocky interior and back again. Now Stanford scientists have devised a pair of math equations that better describe how topography, rock compositions and the movement of water through a landscape affects this vital recycling process. Scientists have long suspected that the so-called the geologic carbon cycle is responsible for...

How Does Soil Store Carbon Dioxide?
2014-01-09 10:17:12

Technische Universität München Global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions continue to rise – in 2012 alone, 35.7 billion tons of this greenhouse gas entered the atmosphere. Some of this CO2 is absorbed by the oceans, plants and soil. As such, they provide a significant reservoir of carbon, stemming the release of CO2. Scientists have now discovered how organic carbon is stored in soil. Basically, the carbon only binds to certain soil structures. This means that soil’s capacity to absorb...

Rivers, Streams Release Far More Carbon Dioxide Than Do Lakes: Study
2013-12-10 06:51:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Contrary to common belief, rivers and streams release carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere at a rate five times greater than the world's lakes and reservoirs combined. The findings of this international study, which included the University of Waterloo, have been published in the journal Nature. "Identifying the sources and amounts of carbon dioxide released from continental water sources has been a gap in understanding the carbon...

2013-10-11 12:46:14

In the land of 10,000 lakes, one lake has been the starting place for research with implications for big lakes around the world. According to a study published online this week in Science, University of Minnesota researchers, building from studies of nitrogen levels in Lake Superior, uncovered a good news/bad news scenario for lake health that has long-term, global implications for pollution control efforts. While many water-quality cleanup efforts focusing on the reduction of phosphorus...

Dark Ocean Carbon Absorption Not Enough To Restrict Global Warming
2013-09-06 07:46:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Iowa shows that although microbes that live below 600 feet where light doesn’t penetrate – the so called “dark ocean”-- might not absorb enough carbon to curtail global warming, they do absorb considerable amounts of carbon, meriting further study. The findings of this study were published in the International Society of Microbial Ecology Journal. While many people are familiar with the...

Extreme Weather Adds To Warming
2013-08-15 05:05:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Extreme weather and climate events such as heavy precipitation, violent storms, heat waves and lengthy droughts cause terrestrial ecosystems to absorb approximately 11 billion tons less carbon dioxide each year, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. That is equivalent to approximately one-third of global CO2 emissions each year, according to an international team of researchers led by...


Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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