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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:07 EDT

Latest Biogeochemical cycle Stories

Reimagining How Earth Emerged Out Of Ice Age
2014-03-19 14:15:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers, publishing a paper in the journal Nature, say rapid erosion in mountain regions could explain why the Earth isn’t essentially still a snowball. Scientists have long believed that rocks pushed up to the surface by plate tectonics absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide, and volcanic processes are what helps to emit this CO2. However, despite this theory and a variety of other hypotheses being put forward to balance the...

How Mountains And Rivers Make Life Possible
2014-03-14 14:47:09

Stanford University Favorable conditions for life on Earth are enabled in part by the natural shuttling of carbon dioxide from the planet's atmosphere to its rocky interior and back again. Now Stanford scientists have devised a pair of math equations that better describe how topography, rock compositions and the movement of water through a landscape affects this vital recycling process. Scientists have long suspected that the so-called the geologic carbon cycle is responsible for...

How Does Soil Store Carbon Dioxide?
2014-01-09 10:17:12

Technische Universität München Global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions continue to rise – in 2012 alone, 35.7 billion tons of this greenhouse gas entered the atmosphere. Some of this CO2 is absorbed by the oceans, plants and soil. As such, they provide a significant reservoir of carbon, stemming the release of CO2. Scientists have now discovered how organic carbon is stored in soil. Basically, the carbon only binds to certain soil structures. This means that soil’s capacity to absorb...

Rivers, Streams Release Far More Carbon Dioxide Than Do Lakes: Study
2013-12-10 06:51:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Contrary to common belief, rivers and streams release carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere at a rate five times greater than the world's lakes and reservoirs combined. The findings of this international study, which included the University of Waterloo, have been published in the journal Nature. "Identifying the sources and amounts of carbon dioxide released from continental water sources has been a gap in understanding the carbon...

2013-10-11 12:46:14

In the land of 10,000 lakes, one lake has been the starting place for research with implications for big lakes around the world. According to a study published online this week in Science, University of Minnesota researchers, building from studies of nitrogen levels in Lake Superior, uncovered a good news/bad news scenario for lake health that has long-term, global implications for pollution control efforts. While many water-quality cleanup efforts focusing on the reduction of phosphorus...

Dark Ocean Carbon Absorption Not Enough To Restrict Global Warming
2013-09-06 07:46:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Iowa shows that although microbes that live below 600 feet where light doesn’t penetrate – the so called “dark ocean”-- might not absorb enough carbon to curtail global warming, they do absorb considerable amounts of carbon, meriting further study. The findings of this study were published in the International Society of Microbial Ecology Journal. While many people are familiar with the...

Extreme Weather Adds To Warming
2013-08-15 05:05:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Extreme weather and climate events such as heavy precipitation, violent storms, heat waves and lengthy droughts cause terrestrial ecosystems to absorb approximately 11 billion tons less carbon dioxide each year, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. That is equivalent to approximately one-third of global CO2 emissions each year, according to an international team of researchers led by...

2013-08-08 09:18:00

Forests have a limited capacity to soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide, according to a new study from Northern Arizona University. The study, available online in the journal New Phytologist, aimed to explore how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide could alter the carbon and nitrogen content of ecosystems. By performing tests on subtropical woodland plots over an 11-year period, the researchers found that ecosystem carbon uptake was not significantly increased by the high CO2...

Trees Use Water More Efficiently Due To CO2 Rise
2013-07-11 08:01:38

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Trees are becoming more efficient at using water in response to higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, according to new research published Wednesday in the journal Nature. In the study, researchers including Dave Hollinger from the US Forest Service's Northern Research Station (NRS) and Trevor Keenan of Harvard University analyzed direct, long-term measurements of whole-ecosystem carbon and water exchange. According to...

Oceans Of The Past Give Clues To The Future
2013-06-15 05:39:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The oceans of the past were quite different than the ones we see today. Ocean temperatures are increasing due to global warming, and these increases are harming marine food webs. Coastal dead zones are also being created by the run-off from fertilizers. An international team of researchers, led by McGill University, has completed the first global study of changes that occurred during the nitrogen cycle at the end of the last ice age....