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Latest Biogeography Stories

2011-08-25 21:35:49

Globally, irrigation increases agricultural productivity by an amount roughly equivalent to the entire agricultural output of the U.S., according to a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study. That adds up to a sizeable impact on carbon uptake from the atmosphere. It also means that water shortages – already forecasted to be a big problem as the world warms – could contribute to yet more warming through a positive feedback loop. The new research quantified irrigation's...

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2011-08-04 13:22:04

Scientists report they have found that savannas prevailed most of East African sites where human ancestors and their ape relatives evolved for the past 6 million years. The University of Utah scientists used chemical isotopes in ancient soil to measure prehistoric tree cover in order to make this discovery. "We've been able to quantify how much shade was available in the geological past," geochemist Thure Cerling, senior author of a study of the new method in the Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011...

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2011-06-24 05:30:00

According to new research from the Census of Marine Life Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP), two expanses of the North Pacific Ocean are attracting an array of marine predators in predictable seasonal patterns. The new report archives the TOPP program's effort to track top marine predator movements in the Pacific Ocean. The study found major hot spots for large marine predators that exist in the California Current, which flows south along the U.S. west coast, and a trans-oceanic migration...

2011-06-23 23:06:24

Ian Jonsen, a research associate and adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at Dalhousie University and co-lead investigator of the Future of Marine Animal Populations Project (FMAP), has teamed up with Barbara Block at Stanford University and several other American researchers to conclude a two year study entitled, "Tracking apex marine predator movements in a dynamic ocean" published in the science journal Nature released June 22. The study summarized the results from a ten year...

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2011-05-23 07:47:10

Forest fragmentation driven by demand for palm oil is having a catastrophic effect on multiple levels of biodiversity, scientists from Queen Mary, University of London have discovered. The researchers are worried that unless steps are taken to safeguard and manage the remaining forest, then certain species will struggle to survive. The study, which focused on bats as an indicator of environmental change, was published in one of the leading scientific journals, Ecology Letters. The team...

2011-04-21 23:05:43

The Earth may be able to recover from rising carbon dioxide emissions faster than previously thought, according to evidence from a prehistoric event analyzed by a Purdue University-led team. When faced with high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and rising temperatures 56 million years ago, the Earth increased its ability to pull carbon from the air. This led to a recovery that was quicker than anticipated by many models of the carbon cycle - though still on the order of tens of thousands...

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2011-04-21 09:28:44

First hectare-scale maps of canopy height, aboveground biomass and associated carbon stock for the forests and woodlands of the conterminous United States The Woods Hole Research Center has released the first hectare-scale maps of canopy height, aboveground biomass, and associated carbon stock for the forests and woodlands of the conterminous United States. The multi-year project, referred to as the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset (NBCD), produced maps of these key forest attributes at an...

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2011-02-22 11:33:50

In the latest issue of 'Current Biology', researchers from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have published an analysis of growth rates of a tiny sea animal. Samples of the bryozoan, (Cellarinella nutti) a sea-bed filter-feeding animal that looks like branching twigs, collected during Captain Scott's Antarctic trips, are yielding data that may prove valuable in projecting climate change, BBC News is reporting. The samples were collected in the Ross Sea, where Capt. Robert Falcon Scott...

2011-02-21 14:42:14

Led by scientists at Woods Hole Research Center A new study released today in the EarlyView of Ecology Letters addresses forest productivity trends in Alaska, highlighting a shift in biomes caused by a warming climate. The findings, conducted by scientists at the Woods Hole Research Center and three other institutions based in Alaska and France, linked satellite observations with an extensive and unique tree-ring data set. Patterns observed support current hypotheses regarding increased...

2011-02-14 15:18:00

NEWS RELEASE WASHINGTON, Feb. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The President's Budget for fiscal year 2012 (FY12) includes $4.631 billion in gross discretionary funding for the Civil Works program of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), offset in part by a proposal to cancel $57 million of prior year funding, of which $35 million was provided through an emergency supplemental appropriation. The Honorable Jo-Ellen Darcy, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, said, "This...


Latest Biogeography Reference Libraries

Hispaniolan Pine, Pinus occidentalis
2014-02-26 08:30:03

Hispaniolan pine (Pinus occidentalis) is found largely on the Caribbean island Hispaniola growing on the slopes. Hispaniolan pine forests can be found on the island of Haiti and the Dominican Republic in the mountain range. The Hispaniolan pine can grow in mixed stands of trees with other broadleaf trees at elevations between 2789 and 6890 feet and in pure stands from 6890 feet up to 10,420 feet. These trees are also found in the lowlands growing in acidic soil that is rich in iron and...

Avocado Tree, Persea americana
2014-02-14 16:17:00

Persea americana is a flowering plant that belongs to the Lauraceae family. It is widely known as the Avocado tree. P. americana is a tree that grows up to 66 feet tall. It has alternately arranged leaves that measure about 5 to 10 inches long. Its flowers are tiny and greenish-yellow, measuring .2 to .4 inches in diameter. The tree’s popular, pear shaped green fruit measures 2.8 to 7.9 inches long and weighs between 3.5 and 35 ounces. It contains a single large seed, measuring 2 to 2.5...

Micro Frog, Microbatrachella Capensis
2013-07-16 12:33:22

The Micro Frog (Microbatrachella capensis) is a minute species of frog belonging to the Pyxicephalidae family, in the monotypic genus Microbatrachella. At about .71 inches long, it is one of the smallest regional species. Its color varies from rufous brown with dark mottling, to tan or green, depending on the population. It is native to the south-western Cape area of South Africa, with a single population located on the Cape Flats of Cape Town and a series of populations on the eastern...

Great Basin Shrub Steppe
2013-04-19 20:40:07

The Great Basin shrub steppe ecoregion, located within the Deserts and xeric shrublands Biome, incorporates a variety of xeric shrub-steppe sub-ecoregions in the area of the Great Basin in the Western United States. It’s within the North American Desert area, and includes a great deal of Nevada, northeastern and eastern California east of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Range rain shadows, and some parts of Utah and Idaho. The Great Basin Desert and semi-arid non-desert xeric shrubland...

Mulga Lands
2013-04-19 20:34:07

The Mulga Lands are an interim Australian bioregion out of eastern Australia made up of dry and sandy plains that are scattered with mulga trees. Located in inland New South Wales and Queensland these are level plains with some low hills and infertile sandy soil with a cover of shrubs and grasses with mulga and eucalyptus trees. The region incorporates regions of wetland, the majority of which are only seasonally flooded, these include Lake Numalla and Lake Wyara, the Currawinya Lakes,...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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