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Latest Biological interactions Stories

Is It Better To Be Social Or Stinky In Thwarting A Predatory Attack?
2014-02-11 05:59:04

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Skunks do it best when halting a predator in its tracks, unleashing a noxious stream of urine that can send the most lethal of hunters in the opposite direction. Other animals of the same group tend to rely on strong social bonds to thwart impending attacks. But why do some animals use noxious scents while others use strong social groups to defend against predation? To better answer this question, Theodore Stankowich, of...

2014-02-10 11:05:48

When people see a skunk, the reaction usually is “Eww,” but when they see a group of meerkats peering around, they often think “Aww.” Why some animals use noxious scents while others live in social groups to defend themselves against predators is the question that biologists Tim Caro of the University of California, Davis and Theodore Stankowich of California State University, Long Beach  and sought to answer through a comprehensive analysis of predator-prey interactions among...

Effectiveness Of Camouflage Types
2013-09-11 11:08:04

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online From military personnel to potential prey, camouflage has proven to be an effective way to evade detection. However, a new study from the University of Exeter has found that some ‘predators’ can learn to read certain types of camouflage more easily than other types. Using human volunteers as their 'predators' in a video game-like simulation, study researchers discovered that high contrast markings on virtual moths, similar to the...

Species Interactions Could Be Affected By Global Warming
2012-06-23 09:06:42

Yale and University of Connecticut researchers report that more extinctions will take place due to global warming should "scientists fail to account for interactions among species in their models." According to Phoebe Zarnetske, primary author and postdoctoral fellow at Yale´s School of forestry & Environmental Studies department, “Currently, most models predicting the effects of climate change treat species separately and focus only on climatic and environmental drivers."...

2012-06-21 23:36:34

Mathematicians at the University of York in the UK and the University of Canterbury in New Zealand say they have disproved a widely accepted theory underpinning the operation of complex networks of interactions in the natural world. Networks are a powerful way to describe ecological communities, which typically involve large numbers of species that can exhibit both negative (e.g. competition or predation) and positive (e.g. mutualism) interactions with one another. Recent mathematical and...

2012-06-21 02:25:37

Mathematicians at the University of York in the UK and the University of Canterbury in New Zealand say they have disproved a widely accepted theory underpinning the operation of complex networks of interactions in the natural world. Networks are a powerful way to describe ecological communities, which typically involve large numbers of species that can exhibit both negative (e.g. competition or predation) and positive (e.g. mutualism) interactions with one another. Recent mathematical and...

2012-05-16 10:53:12

New research shows how bacteria evolve to increase ecosystem functioning by recycling each others waste. The study provides some of the first evidence for how interactions between species shape evolution when there is a diverse community. Predicting how species and ecosystems will respond to new environments is an important task for biology. However, most studies of evolutionary adaptation have considered single species in isolation, despite the fact that all species live in diverse...

Classic Model For Ecological Stability Revised
2012-02-20 04:32:08

Predator-prey relationships stabilize diverse ecosystems, according to calculation A famous mathematical formula which shook the world of ecology 40 years ago has been revisited and refined by two University of Chicago researchers in the current issue of Nature. In 1972, physicist Robert May rankled ecologists by publishing a simple model describing the relationship between diversity and stability in a theoretical ecosystem. Though ecologists had long believed that richer, more diverse...

2011-08-15 00:00:04

Plants and fungi form complex underground networks to trade nutrients and sugars. A new study in the journal Science reveals that partners have evolved a sort of free market economy, allowing them to avoid "Ëœcheaters' and change their trading partners if they don't get a fair deal. Amsterdam, Netherlands (PRWEB) August 14, 2011 Dr. Toby Kiers and her colleagues are interested in how mutualisms "“ cooperative interactions among different species "“ evolve and persist....

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2010-10-19 11:04:02

Relationships among organisms, or mutualisms, might be more important to global ecosystem health than previously thought, argues a research team involving UA professor Judith Bronstein Mutually beneficial partnerships among species may play highly important but vastly underrecognized roles in keeping the Earth's ecosystems running, a group of evolutionary biologists suggests in a study. The authors present evidence that human impacts may be forcing these mutualist systems down unprecedented...


Latest Biological interactions Reference Libraries

Trichinella spiralis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Trichinella spiralis, sometimes known as the pork worm, is a parasite within the Nematoda class. It can be found in pigs, rats, humans, and bears. This worm causes trichinosis in humans, most often from consuming undercooked pork. This species is the smallest within its class, reaching an average body length of .16 centimeters. Females are twice as large as males, displaying a sexual dimorphism. The reproductive organs of females are unique to the species in that the front end holds developed...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.