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Latest Biological oceanography Stories

'Red Tide' Species Deadlier Than First Thought
2012-07-25 15:15:43

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A researcher at the University of Connecticut and his team have discovered that a species of tiny aquatic organism prominent in harmful algal blooms sometimes called "red tide" is even deadlier than first thought, with potential consequences for entire marine food chains. Professor Hans Dam along with his research group in the school's Department of Marine Sciences have discovered that the plankton species Alexandrium tamarense...

Arctic Waters Invaded By Tropical Plankton
2012-07-25 08:29:52

Researchers see natural cycle; but questions arise on climate change For the first time, scientists have identified tropical and subtropical species of marine protozoa living in the Arctic Ocean. Apparently, they traveled thousands of miles on Atlantic currents and ended up above Norway with an unusual–but naturally cyclic–pulse of warm water, not as a direct result of overall warming climate, say the researchers. On the other hand: arctic waters are warming rapidly, and such...

Ocean Fertilization Suffocates Carbon, Reduces Climate Change
2012-07-19 10:19:23

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The negative impact of climate change might be avoided by dumping massive amounts of iron into the world´s oceans, which smothers carbon dioxide for centuries, according to an international team of researchers who have recently published results of an ocean iron fertilization experiment (EIFEX) carried out in 2004. The new study, published in the science journal Nature, shows that sowing the ocean with iron particles sucks up...

2012-07-19 02:39:31

The results, which were published in the scientific journal Nature, provide a valuable contribution to a better understanding of the global carbon cycle An international research team has published the results of an ocean iron fertilization experiment (EIFEX) carried out in 2004 in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature. Unlike the LOHAFEX experiment carried out in 2009, EIFEX has shown that a substantial proportion of carbon from the induced algal bloom sank to the deep sea...

Lakes Harmed From Global Warming
2012-07-17 18:31:40

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As average temperatures across the globe have ticked up, toxic blood-red algae are thriving in central European lakes–according to a new study out of the University of Zurich. In a report published in Nature Climate Change, Swiss researchers assert that the warmest winters the country has seen in the past 40 years hampered the seasonal die-off of Burgundy blood-red algae, a photosynthetic bacterium that has bloomed en masse...

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2012-07-11 09:36:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The acid levels of the world's oceans are increasing far faster than scientists had expected, making it one of the biggest threats to coral reefs and threatening both food supplies and the tourism industry, the head of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) told reporters Monday. Speaking with Kristen Gelineau of the Associated Press (AP), Jane Lubchenco, head of the American scientific organization, said...

North Atlantic Phytoplankton Bloom Triggered By Eddies
2012-07-06 05:16:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists studying the annual growth of tiny plants in the North Atlantic Ocean have discovered that this year´s growth spurt began before the sun was able to offer the light needed to fuel the yearly phenomenon. The annual growth spurt of plankton, which is known as the North Atlantic Bloom, takes place each Spring, and results in an immense number of phytoplankton bursting into existence -- first "greening," then...

2012-07-02 21:57:35

Some coral reef fish may be better prepared to cope with rising CO2 in the world´s oceans — thanks to their parents. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) today reported in the journal Nature Climate Change, encouraging new findings that some fish may be less vulnerable to high CO2 and an acidifying ocean than previously feared. “There has been a lot of concern around the world about recent findings that baby fish are highly...

2012-06-27 22:15:02

The pico is a very small unit, even smaller than the nano as it is the equivalent of 10-12. The biologist Aitor Alonso has devoted himself to studying green algae of this imperceptible size existing in the Bilbao estuary, paying particular attention to the area beyond the Nervión estuary. This has enabled him to identify six genera and eleven nano- and picoplanktonic species that until now had not been catalogued in these waters. He has also put forward some measures designed to...


Latest Biological oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

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2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most often...

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2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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