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Latest Biological oceanography Stories

Pacific Carbon Pump Speeds Up In Summer
2012-02-09 04:44:07

An international team of scientists led by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa oceanographer David Karl has documented a regular, significant and unexpected increase in the amount of particulate matter exported to the deep sea in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. They suspect the previously undocumented phenomenon may be a response to day length, a general phenomenon known as photoperiodism. Measuring the biological carbon pump Using 13 years of...

Scientists Have Questions Concerning Jellyfish Blooms
2012-02-02 06:01:43

Scientists are questioning whether jellyfish blooms are real or just perceived by media hype. The report, which appears in the journal BioScience, questions the validity of increased jellyfish populations being reported around the world. The report was issued by the Global Jellyfish Group, which is a consortium of around 30 experts on gelatinous organisms, climatology, oceanography, and socioeconomics from around the globe. Rob Condon, who led the study, says “Clearly, there are...

2012-01-25 04:22:41

Ultraviolet radiation is the catalyst for cellular damage in phytoplankton The Bren School-based authors of a study published Jan. 20 in the journal PLoS ONE have observed toxicity to marine organisms resulting from exposure to a nanoparticle that had not previously been shown to be toxic under similar conditions. Lead author and assistant research biologist Robert Miller and co-authors Arturo Keller and Hunter Lenihan — both Bren School professors and lead scientists at the UC...

Image 1 - Ocean Acidification Study Helps Scientists Evaluate Effects On Marine Life
2012-01-24 04:05:48

Might a penguin's next meal be affected by the exhaust from your tailpipe? The answer may be yes, when you add your exhaust fumes to the total amount of carbon dioxide lofted into the atmosphere by humans since the industrial revolution. One-third of that carbon dioxide is absorbed by the world's oceans, making them more acidic and affecting marine life. A UC Santa Barbara marine scientist and a team of 18 other researchers have reported results of the broadest worldwide study of ocean...

2012-01-10 23:41:35

New process for producing biodiesel from microalgae oil The available amount of fossil fuels is limited and their combustion in vehicle motors increases atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The generation of fuels from biomass as an alternative is on the rise. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Johannes A. Lercher and his team at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen have now introduced a new catalytic process that allows the effective conversion of biopetroleum from microalgae into diesel...

Image 1 - Trouble In Paradise: Ocean Acidification This Way Comes
2012-01-06 05:09:08

Sustainability of tropical corals in question, but some species developing survival mechanisms Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble. ---Shakespeare, Macbeth Mo'orea, it's called--this island in French Polynesia that's been dubbed the most beautiful island in the world. Here Tahitian breezes dance across crystal blue waters and beneath the tropical seas lies a necklace of coral reefs that encircles Mo'orea like a string of brightly colored jewels....

2012-01-05 16:39:24

In 1997, scientists at the Center for Neurodynamics at the University of Missouri - St. Louis demonstrated that special sensors covering the elongated snout of paddlefish are electroreceptors that help the fish detect prey by responding to the weak voltage gradients that swimming zooplankton create in the surrounding water. Now some of the same researchers have found that the electroreceptors contain oscillators, which generate rhythmical firing of electrosensory neurons. The oscillators...

2011-11-29 11:01:53

Direct effects of climate warming on biodiversity pose a serious conservation challenge for marine life, according to new research published today in Science. Marine life may need to relocate faster than land species as well as speed up alterations in the timing of major life cycle events. This challenges previous thinking that marine life in the ocean would respond more gradually than species on land because of slower warming in the oceans. “Analyses of global temperature found...

Image 1 - Run-off, Emissions Deliver Double Whammy To Coastal Marine Creatures
2011-10-25 03:07:28

Increasing acidification in coastal waters could compromise the ability of oysters and other marine creatures to form and keep their shells, according to a new study led by University of Georgia researchers. Their findings will be published in the November 2011 issue of Nature Geoscience. The researchers determined the combined effects of fertilizer runoff carried by the Mississippi River to the northern Gulf of Mexico and excess atmospheric carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels result...

Giant Amoebas Found Deep in Mariana Trench
2011-10-23 05:33:05

During a summer expedition to the deepest region on the planet, the Mariana Trench, a team of researchers and engineers witnessed a breed of giant amoebas known as xenophyophores living at depths that had never been recorded before, various media outlets reported over the weekend. The team, which consisted of scientists representing the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and National Geographic engineers, used untethered landers known as dropcams, lights, and digital video...


Latest Biological oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

45_9dcdfc9da62991a8f200f2f82f8638d9
2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most often...

39_6e87e3fa1b5a996861bc65cc76c916fa
2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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