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Latest Biological oceanography Stories

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2011-06-10 11:08:21

Fish farming is the world's fastest growing food production method and is projected to continue rising to meet the demands of an increasing world population. ESA's new Aquaculture project will support sustainable aquaculture by developing an information service based on state-of-the-art remote sensing. Satellites can provide a wealth of data on waves, sea-surface temperature and ocean color "“ all highly useful for planning where to establish new fish farms. "Sustainability depends on...

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2011-06-07 08:43:40

A new study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) shows that jellyfish are more than a nuisance to bathers and boaters, drastically altering marine food webs by shunting food energy from fish toward bacteria. An apparent increase in the size and frequency of jellyfish blooms in coastal and estuarine waters around the world during the last few decades means that jellies' impact on marine food webs is likely to increase into the future. The results of the study, led...

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2011-06-03 10:59:35

Scientists discover how "Didymo" algae bloom in pristine waters with few nutrients The pristine state of unpolluted waterways may be their downfall, according to research results published in a paper this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. A species of freshwater algae that lives in streams and rivers, called Didymo for Didymosphenia geminata, is able to colonize and dominate the bottoms of some of the world's cleanest waterways--precisely because they are so clear. Didymo does...

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2011-06-01 09:55:33

Since the Industrial Revolution, over half of all the CO2 produced by burning fossil fuels has been absorbed by the ocean, making pH drop faster than any time in the last 650,000 years and resulting in ocean acidification. Recent studies have shown that this causes fish to lose their sense of smell, but a new study published May 31 in Biology Letters shows that fish hearing is also compromised. Working with Professor Philip Munday at James Cook University, lead author Dr Steve Simpson of the...

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2011-05-30 12:46:25

According to new findings, seas off Papua New Guinea suggest that acidifying oceans will severely hit coral reefs by the end of the century. Carbon dioxide bubbles into the water from the slopes of a dormant volcano there, making it more acidic. Coral is badly affected and not growing at all in the CO2-rich zone. The scientists say this "lab" mimics conditions that will be widespread if CO2 emissions continue. The oceans absorb some of the carbon dioxide that human activities are putting...

2011-05-26 21:23:37

Coastal communities hard hit by ocean acidification hotspots have more options than they may realize, says an interdisciplinary team of science and legal experts. In a paper published in the journal Science, experts from Stanford University's Center for Ocean Solutions and colleagues make the case that communities don't need to wait for a global solution to ocean acidification to fix a local problem that is compromising their marine environment. Many localized acidification hotspots can be...

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2011-05-13 03:20:56

Cycle enables marine phytoplankton to use carbon and nitrogen from their environment Scientists have discovered that marine diatoms, tiny phytoplankton abundant in the sea, have an animal-like urea cycle, and that this cycle enables the diatoms to efficiently use carbon and nitrogen from their environment. The researchers, from the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) and other institutions, published their findings in this week's issue of the journal Nature. The team, led by lead author Andrew...

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2011-05-13 03:11:59

Scientists have known for two decades that sulfur compounds that are produced by bacterioplankton as they consume decaying algae in the ocean cycle through two paths. In one, a sulfur compound dimethylsulfide, or DMS, goes into the atmosphere, where it leads to water droplet formation "“ the basis of clouds that cool the Earth. In the other, a sulfur compound goes into the ocean's food web, where it is eaten and returned to seawater. What they haven't known is how sulfur is routed one...

2011-05-12 00:06:42

The urea cycle is a metabolic pathway used in mammals to incorporate excess nitrogen into urea and remove it from the body. However, it appears to play a far more wide-ranging role in the group of algae known as diatoms. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam are part of an international team of researchers that has succeeded in identifying the urea cycle in diatoms as a distribution and recycling centre for inorganic carbon and nitrogen. The urea...

2011-05-11 12:00:00

SAN DIEGO, May 11, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) along with an international team of scientists have published a paper detailing new findings about marine diatoms showing that they utilize a urea cycle and that this cycle enables these organisms to efficiently utilize carbon and nitrogen from their environment. The paper is being published in the May 12th, 2011 issue of the journal Nature. The research team, led by Andrew Allen from...


Latest Biological oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

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2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most...

39_6e87e3fa1b5a996861bc65cc76c916fa
2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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