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Latest Biological oceanography Stories

2013-07-17 11:01:52

University of Adelaide marine biologists have found that reducing nutrient pollution in coastal marine environments should help protect kelp forests from the damaging effects of rising CO2. The researchers have found a combined effect on kelp forests from nutrient pollution and higher CO2, which could have a devastating impact on Australia's marine ecosystems. "When we manipulated CO2 and nutrient levels in an experimental marine ecosystem we found the effect of both of them together...

Ancient Algal Bloom Mystery Solved
2013-07-15 15:05:24

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An ancient bloom of life that occurred just after the last ice age isn't what it seemed at first, according to new research in the journal Nature Geoscience. Scientists had long believed that the bloom, which occurred around 14,000 years ago, was spurred by rising sea levels washing iron into the ocean. However, the new study suggested that a "perfect storm" of conditions allowed for the bloom to happen, and not simply the abundance of...

Phytoplankton Ocean Turbulence Social Mixers
2013-07-15 12:58:35

[Watch the video: Phytoplankton Social Mixers] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The motility of phytoplankton allows the tiny ocean plants to determine their fate in ocean turbulence, according to scientists at MIT and Oxford University. Researchers wrote in the journal Nature Communications that the individual vortices that make up ocean turbulence are like social mixers for phytoplankton. This social mixer brings similar cells into close proximity, helping to...

Ocean Acidification Has Transformed Delicate Ecosystem
2013-07-09 15:43:58

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While many studies have focused on how ocean acidification may impact various individual species, an international team of researchers has just published a study on how an entire ecosystem can be affected by a more acidic ocean. As one of the consequences of climate change, ocean acidification is expected to significantly increase if carbon emissions continue at current rates. According to the study, which was published in...

Sea Lettuce Invades Chinese Beach
2013-07-06 05:51:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online It may be called the Yellow Sea, but the northern part of the East China Sea has turned green due to the largest algal bloom in the history of the Asian nation, various media outlets are reporting. According to AFP news agency reports, the State Oceanic Administration is reporting that the algae, which is known as Enteromorpha prolifera, started appearing about one week ago, and among the places affected are a public beach in...

2013-06-13 10:54:29

A new study on the feeding habits of ocean microbes calls into question the potential use of algal blooms to trap carbon dioxide and offset rising global levels. These blooms contain iron-eating microscopic phytoplankton that absorb C02 from the air through the process of photosynthesis and provide nutrients for marine life. But one type of phytoplankton, a diatom, is using more iron that it needs for photosynthesis and storing the extra in its silica skeletons and shells, according to an...

Carbon Dioxide Absorption In Antarctic Seas Studied
2013-06-13 09:39:28

Georgia Institute of Technology The seas around Antarctica can, at times, resemble a garden. Large-scale experiments where scientists spray iron into the waters, literally fertilizing phytoplankton, have created huge man-made algal blooms. Such geoengineering experiments produce diatoms, which pull carbon dioxide out of the air. Experts argue that this practice can help offset Earth´s rising carbon dioxide levels. However, the experiments are controversial and, according to a new...

Dead Jellyfish Help Absorb Carbon Dioxide
2013-05-29 09:55:33

Rebekah Eliason for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Humans constantly produce carbon dioxide (CO2), both naturally and as a byproduct of industrial processes. The ocean absorbs about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activity. Tiny organisms called plankton live in the ocean and break down this natural greenhouse gas by converting itinto sugars and carbohydrates through photosynthesis. In order to understand the efficiency of the ocean´s carbon...

Robotic Sensor Tracks Toxic Red Tide
2013-05-08 09:53:09

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The way scientists monitor and manage red tides or harmful algal blooms (HABs) in New England may be transformed by a new robotic sensor deployed in the Gulf of Maine coastal waters by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). WHOI launched the new instrument at the end of last month and expects to deploy a second system later this spring. The robotic sensor will add critical data to weekly real-time forecasts of the New England...


Latest Biological oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

45_9dcdfc9da62991a8f200f2f82f8638d9
2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most often...

39_6e87e3fa1b5a996861bc65cc76c916fa
2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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