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Latest Biological oceanography Stories

Red Tide Killing Record Number Of Manatees In Florida
2013-03-11 10:44:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A red algae bloom, also known as Red Tide, is currently killing a record number of manatees living off the coast of Florida. Last week, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) found an average of 10 dead manatees a day and some observers said the phenomenon doesn´t appear to be receding. A toxin produced by the red algae affects the nervous system of the manatees causing them to drown. "This is probably...

How Sensitive US East Coast Regions May Be To Ocean Acidification Revealed By New Study
2013-03-01 12:17:31

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution A continental-scale chemical survey in the waters of the eastern U.S. and Gulf of Mexico is helping researchers determine how distinct bodies of water will resist changes in acidity. The study, which measures varying levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other forms of carbon in the ocean, was conducted by scientists from 11 institutions across the U.S. and was published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography. “Before now, we haven't had a very...

Smartphone App Allows Seamen To Track Phytoplankton For Science
2013-02-24 08:08:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at the Plymouth University Marine Institute have developed a new smartphone app that they claim will allow regular folks to help scientists track the impact of climate change on phytoplankton. In a statement released Friday, the university reports that scientists are concerned that the tiny organisms, which are at the bottom end of the marine life food chain, could be decreasing in numbers due to increasing sea...

Growth Of Toxic Algae Caused By Nitrogen From Pollution And Natural Sources
2013-02-07 10:17:49

San Francisco State University Nitrogen in ocean waters fuels the growth of two tiny but toxic phytoplankton species that are harmful to marine life and human health, warns a new study published in the Journal of Phycology. Researchers from San Francisco State University found that nitrogen entering the ocean -- whether through natural processes or pollution -- boosts the growth and toxicity of a group of phytoplankton that can cause the human illness Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning....

Ancient And Modern Tiny Marine Algae Provide Climate Change Clues
2013-02-04 10:21:39

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK) Microscopic ocean algae called coccolithophores are providing clues about the impact of climate change both now and many millions of years ago. The study found that their response to environmental change varies between species, in terms of how quickly they grow. Coccolithophores, a type of plankton, are not only widespread in the modern ocean but they are also prolific in the fossil record because their tiny calcium carbonate shells are...

Scientists Analyze Costs And Benefits Of Rock Dissolving Practices
2013-01-22 12:14:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Geoengineering is a controversial and illegal practice that attempts to mitigate the forces of climate change on a grand scale. Many see this attempt to alter global climate via artificial means as a ℠quick fix´ with potential long-term negative effects. However, despite the contentious nature of geoengineering, scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany decided to analyze a ℠rock...

Bondi Beach Closed Due To Algae Bloom
2012-11-27 19:59:28

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Tourists at Australia's Bondi Beach were surprised to see what looked like blood-soaked water heading their way this week. Bondi Beach is a popular tourists destination around Sydney Australia, but the area had to be closed after a huge algal bloom took over some of the area's waters. Ten News Sydney reported that despite the warnings, a number of beachgoers were still venturing into the water and swimming through the red...

Ocean Acidification Threatens Antarctic Marine Wildlife
2012-11-26 05:01:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers has uncovered the first evidence that marine creatures living in the Antarctic region are being affected by ocean acidification. That evidence was discovered in 2008, when researchers from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), the University of East Anglia (UEA), the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) observed that the shells...

Movement Of Seawater Affects How Marine Bacteria Absorb Organic Material
2012-11-01 14:39:18

National Science Foundation New research shows that ocean turbulence directly affects the ability of microscopic marine organisms to recycle organic material back into the food web. Results of the study are published in this week's issue of the journal Science. Scientists John Taylor of Cambridge University and Roman Stocker at MIT found that there's a relationship between the natural movement of water in the ocean and the ability of marine bacteria to act as recyclers. "The...

Warming Oceans Will Play Major Role In Less Phytoplankton Diversity
2012-10-26 07:33:14

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Phytoplankton (plant wanderers), organisms that exist in the sunlit layer of the world´s oceans, are important for the sustainability of the aquatic food web. However, future warming oceans could significantly alter the populations of these important organisms, further impacting climate change. Since phytoplankton play a major role in the food chain and the world´s carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous cycles, a significant...


Latest Biological oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

45_9dcdfc9da62991a8f200f2f82f8638d9
2014-01-12 00:00:00

A salp is a barrel-shaped, free-floating tunicate (any living organism which has a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic with two openings or siphons for the ingress and egress of water). It moves by contracting which pumps water through its body. The salp strains the water with internal feeding filters as it goes through the body. It consumes phytoplankton that are strained from the water. Salps are common throughout equatorial, temperate, and colder seas. They are most often...

39_6e87e3fa1b5a996861bc65cc76c916fa
2007-04-03 00:34:20

The South American pilchard, Sardinops sagax, is a sardine of the Family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops, found in the indo-Pacific oceans. Their length is up to 15.75 in (40 cm). It has a number of other common names: Australian pilchard, Blue pilchard, Blue-bait, Californian pilchard, Chilean sardine, Japanese pilchard, Pacific sardine, and Southern African pilchard. The South American pilchard is a coastal species that forms large schools. Coloration is blue green on...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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