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Latest Biological pump Stories

Dead Jellyfish Help Absorb Carbon Dioxide
2013-05-29 09:55:33

Rebekah Eliason for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Humans constantly produce carbon dioxide (CO2), both naturally and as a byproduct of industrial processes. The ocean absorbs about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activity. Tiny organisms called plankton live in the ocean and break down this natural greenhouse gas by converting itinto sugars and carbohydrates through photosynthesis. In order to understand the efficiency of the ocean´s carbon...

Fish Poop May Be Critical To Ocean Carbon Cycle
2012-10-11 12:28:11

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Professor Deborah Steinberg of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) has dedicated her professional life to investigating crustaceans and their role in the “biological pump,” which is the process by which marine life transports carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and ocean´s surface to the deep sea. This cycle removes the carbon to a depth where it contributes nothing to global warming. In a new study...

2010-10-14 08:45:54

Projects address concern for acidifying marine ecosystems With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and moving into marine systems, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic, scientists have shown. To address the growing concern for acidifying marine systems, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded 21 grants under the Ocean Acidification theme of its Climate Research Investment. The awards are supported and managed by NSF's Office of Polar Programs,...

2010-07-01 14:16:40

Adding nutrients to the sea could decrease viral infection rates among phytoplankton and enhance the efficiency of the biological pump, a means by which carbon is transferred from the atmosphere to the deep ocean, according to a new mathematical modelling study. The findings, published in the Journal of Theoretical Biology, have implications for ocean geo-engineering schemes proposed for tackling global warming. Tiny free-floating algae called phytoplankton dominate biological production in...

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2010-01-08 13:22:59

The impact on levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere by the decaying remains of a group of marine creatures that includes starfish and sea urchin has been significantly underestimated. "Climate models must take this carbon sink into account," says Mario Lebrato, lead author of the study. The work was done when he was at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) and affiliated with the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science (SOES); he is now at the...

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2009-08-24 13:30:21

A marine scientist said Alaska's $4.6 billion fishing industry might be in danger because marine waters in the area are turning acidic from absorbing greenhouse gases faster than tropical waters, The Associated Press reported. Jeremy Mathis, a chemical oceanographer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, said the same things that make Alaska's marine waters among the most productive in the world - cold, shallow depths and abundant marine life "“ also make them the most vulnerable to...

2009-08-13 15:45:42

 The same things that make Alaska's marine waters among the most productive in the world may also make them the most vulnerable to ocean acidification. According to new findings by a University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist, Alaska's oceans are becoming increasingly acidic, which could damage Alaska's king crab and salmon fisheries.This spring, chemical oceanographer Jeremy Mathis returned from a cruise armed with seawater samples collected from the depths of the Gulf of Alaska. When he...

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2009-03-09 09:55:00

A new study found that ocean acidification caused by climate change is stripping away the protective shell of tiny yet vital organisms that absorb huge amounts of carbon pollution from the atmosphere, the AFP reported. The study found that the calcium carapace of microscopic animals called foraminifera living in the Southern Ocean have fallen in weight by a third since the start of the Industrial Revolution. The tiny organisms inhabit the surface waters of oceans around the world and are an...