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Latest Biological weapons Stories

2009-09-18 09:08:35

University of Hawaii at Manoa assistant researcher Durrell Kapan recently published a paper, Man Bites Mosquito: Understanding the Contribution of Human Movement to Vector-Borne Disease Dynamics, in PLoS One. Published August 26, the paper highlights how daily commuting patterns in mega-cities may be a critically overlooked factor in understanding the resurgence of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever, infecting 50-100 million people annually. "Even a small number of infected people...

2009-08-31 08:00:00

CHICAGO, Aug. 31 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Advanced Life Sciences Holdings, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: ADLS), today announced positive results from an animal study involving its novel, once-a-day, oral antibiotic Restanza(TM) (cethromycin) that was conducted to measure Restanza's therapeutic efficacy in treating inhalation anthrax after symptoms of infection had developed. The results of the placebo-controlled non-human primate study showed that a 14-day course of Restanza achieved up to a...

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2009-08-13 09:40:00

The southwest suburbs of Chicago may hold the secret to understanding West Nile virus, a pathogen that has infected thousands since it appeared in North America in 1999."There are few other cities with such good conditions for the virus to persist," explained Tony Goldberg, epidemiologist and professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's School of Veterinary Medicine.In a study funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health through their joint program in...

2009-07-21 11:48:57

To control mosquito-borne diseases like dengue, researchers need to look at the behavior of people, not just the insect that transmits the disease, according to new research by Steven Stoddard of the University of California, Davis, and intercollegiate colleagues. The study, published July 21 in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, exhibits work by an international, multidisciplinary team of vector biologists, sociologists and virologists studying dengue in Iquitos,...

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2009-07-08 13:40:00

Experts say more than half of the states in the U.S. now have mosquitoes that are known to spread dengue fever. A new report by the Natural Resources Defense Council showed that two types of mosquitoes capable of transmitting the dengue fever virus are invading Southern and Mid-Atlantic states, creating conditions more favorable for an outbreak. An estimated 173 million Americans live in counties that now contain one or both of the mosquito species, a problem that could escalate with global...

2009-06-23 09:20:53

A Minnesota woman who died from hantavirus may have contracted the rodent-linked disease during a trip through the Grand Canyon, authorities said. The woman, whose name and hometown were not released, died June 12 at a hospital outside Arizona, said Trish Lees, a spokeswoman for the Coconino County, Ariz., Health Department. The woman, in her early 50s, may have contracted the disease during a family boating trip on the Colorado River in mid- to late-May, Lees told the Arizona Daily Sun,...

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2009-06-05 15:55:00

Scientists use climate variables and vegetation indices to predict and mitigate Dengue epidemics in the American tropics-Dengue Fever (DF) and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) are the most important vector-borne viral diseases in the World. Around 50-100 million cases appear each year putting 2.5 billion people at risk of suffering this debilitating and sometimes fatal disease. Dengue Fever is prevalent in the Tropics. For that reason, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the...

2009-06-04 15:32:34

U.S. medical entomologists have discovered tiny flies known as midges can be used to control invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes that can carry dengue fever. University of Illinois scientists led by Barry Alto said the larvae of midges (Corethrella appendiculata) eat more of the larvae of the invasive mosquito than of the native Eastern treehole mosquito (Aedes triseriatus). That, the scientists said, allows the native mosquitoes to survive even though the invasive mosquitoes are better at...

2009-06-04 10:15:06

In a drama played out across the southeastern U.S. in containers as small as a coffee cup, native and invasive mosquito larvae compete for resources and try to avoid getting eaten. One of the invasive mosquitoes, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), can carry dengue fever, a viral disease that sickens 50 to 100 million people a year in the tropics, so this seemingly inconsequential struggle has implications for human health.In a new study in the British Ecological Society's Journal of...

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2009-05-25 13:23:05

The world's top agency for animal health said on Monday that climate change is widening viral disease among farm animals, expanding the spread of some microbes that are also a known risk to humans, AFP reported. A survey of 126 member-states found 71 percent were "extremely concerned" about the expected impact of climate change on animal disease, according to The World Animal Health Organization"”known as OIE, an acronym of its name in French. Among those surveyed, 58 percent said they...


Latest Biological weapons Reference Libraries

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2011-04-15 15:02:18

Francisella tularensis is a pathogenic species of gram-negative bacteria and the causative agent of tularemia or rabbit fever. It is a facultative intracellular bacterium. It is classified as a Class A agent by the U.S. government due to its ease of spread by aerosol and its high virulence. In 1911 the species was found in ground squirrels in California. There are four subspecies that have been classified. Biovar tularensis is found mostly in North America. Biovar palearctica is found...

72_ee74f19d6ec18e594c4d7bc49406908f
2011-04-14 16:11:25

Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative, bipolar, aerobic, motile rod-shaped bacterium. It causes the disease melioidosis in humans and animals and is also capable of infecting plants. The bacteria can from in a number of artificial environments. Optimal temperature is around 40°C in pH-neutral or slightly acidic environments. Most strains can ferment sugars without gas formation. The bacteria produces both exo and endo toxins although the role of these toxins has not been fully...

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2011-03-04 17:38:30

Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease with a 40 to 50 nm enveloped RNA virus with positive sense of the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted by the bite of female mosquitoes and is found in tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa, but not in Asia. Primates and a few kinds of mosquitoes are the only known hosts. The origin of the disease is most likely Africa. From there it was introduced to South America through the slave trade in the 16th century. There...

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2011-02-23 21:21:50

Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus is a mosquito-borne viral pathogen that causes Venezuelan equine encephalitis or encephalomyelitis (VEE). It can affect all equine species, such as horses, donkeys, and zebras. Equines may suddenly die or show progressive central nervous system disorders after infection. It is contractible by humans and will usually experience flu-like symptoms when infected. People with a weak immune system can become seriously ill or die. It is transmitted primarily...

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2011-02-23 20:38:02

Rinderpest (also cattle plague) is an infectious viral disease of cattle, domestic buffalo, and some species of wildlife. It is characterized by fever, oral erosions, diarrhea, lymphoid necrosis, and high mortality. The last confirmed case was in 2001. In 2011 it should be announced that a global eradication of rinderpest was complete. The term comes from the German language meaning cattle-plague. The rinderpest virus is closely related to measles and canine distemper viruses. It is a...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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