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Latest Biological weapons Stories

2009-02-02 12:19:55

Australian scientists say hoarding water as climate change intensifies might aid the dengue fever-carrying mosquito Aedes aegypti in extending its range. The lead author of the study, Michael Kearney of the University of Melbourne, said climate change and evolutionary change could act together to accelerate and expand the mosquito's range. But human behavior in the form of storing water to cope with climate change is likely to have an even greater impact. The potential direct impact of...

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2009-01-05 15:21:13

An academic at Wyoming University has warned that it would be "relatively easy" for terrorists to launch a devastating attack using swarms of insects to spread a deadly disease. "Rift Valley Fever or other diseases could be transported into a country by a terrorist with a suitcase," said Jeffrey Lockwood, a professor of entomology and author of Six-legged Soldiers: Using Insects as Weapons of War. "I think a small terrorist cell could very easily develop an insect-based weapon," he added....

2008-12-14 08:51:19

A rare outbreak of anthrax has killed 13 cows in Sweden, but is unlikely to harm people, says the country's Institute for Infectious Disease Control. The farm near Varberg in western Sweden has been quarantined and the remaining animals treated with antibiotics, which is effective against anthrax, said Bengt Larsson, a spokesman for the Institute. Anthrax can pass from animals to humans, but it is unusual for that to happen and antibiotics guard against it, Larsson said, noting the bacteria...

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2008-12-11 11:07:30

Research conducted at The University of Queensland could contribute to the development of a vaccine and cure for West Nile virus and Dengue fever. Led by Associate Professor Alexander Khromykh, a team of researchers from UQ's School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences identified a novel characteristic of the virus family to which these diseases belong. The team found all flaviviruses produced a small molecule which, among other functions, controlled the host's response to viral infection....

2008-11-12 03:00:16

Air travel, international trade and globalized food production are helping "airport malaria" and other diseases spread to the United States, researchers say. Dr. James H. Diaz of Louisiana State University said airport malaria is transmitted when a mosquito infected with the disease bites a human within the vicinity of an international airport. Climate changes in some U.S. cities with a large presence of international air traffic, such as New York and Los Angeles, seem to have created a...

2008-11-06 06:00:21

SAN DIEGO, Nov. 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Vical Incorporated today announced that the Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) plans to conduct preclinical and Phase 1 evaluation of a dengue DNA vaccine formulated with the company's Vaxfectin(R) adjuvant and delivered with the Biojector(R) 2000 needle-free injection system (Bioject Medical Technologies Inc.) (BULLETIN BOARD: BJCT) . In support of the program, Vical will manufacture the vaccine and the adjuvant under a $1.3 million contract,...

2008-11-04 15:00:20

U.S. entomologists say they've determined smaller mosquitoes are more likely to be infected with viruses causing human diseases than are larger mosquitoes. The researchers said they fed mosquitoes blood contaminated with the dengue virus and later tested them for infection at the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, taking into account the size of each mosquito by measuring the length of their wings. They discovered smaller-sized mosquitoes had higher infection rates and greater...

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2008-11-04 10:37:25

An entomologist at the Illinois Natural History Survey, a division of the new UI Institute for Natural Resource Sustainability, says smaller mosquitoes are more likely to be infected with viruses that cause diseases in humans. These findings can be found in the November issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Barry Alto, Ph.D., Director of the Medical Entomology Program at the Illinois Natural History Survey, along with Assistant Professor Michael Reiskind of Oklahoma...

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2008-10-29 12:05:00

Popular media coverage of infectious diseases greatly influences how people perceive those diseases, making them seem more dangerous, according to a new study from McMaster University. The research, published online in the Public Library of Science: ONE, suggests diseases that show up frequently in the print media "“like bird flu "“are considered more serious than similar diseases that do not receive the same kind of coverage, such as yellow fever. "The media tend to focus on rare...

2008-10-22 15:00:30

Syntiron announced today that it was notified of a pending contract from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to adapt Syntiron's licensed, patented vaccine technology to combat three major bioterrorism agents; Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. The amount of the contract is $3.8 million dollars. Bacillus anthracis: A non-contagious, potentially fatal disease, commonly referred to as anthrax, caused by breathing, eating, or absorbing through cuts in...


Latest Biological weapons Reference Libraries

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2011-04-15 15:02:18

Francisella tularensis is a pathogenic species of gram-negative bacteria and the causative agent of tularemia or rabbit fever. It is a facultative intracellular bacterium. It is classified as a Class A agent by the U.S. government due to its ease of spread by aerosol and its high virulence. In 1911 the species was found in ground squirrels in California. There are four subspecies that have been classified. Biovar tularensis is found mostly in North America. Biovar palearctica is found...

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2011-04-14 16:11:25

Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative, bipolar, aerobic, motile rod-shaped bacterium. It causes the disease melioidosis in humans and animals and is also capable of infecting plants. The bacteria can from in a number of artificial environments. Optimal temperature is around 40°C in pH-neutral or slightly acidic environments. Most strains can ferment sugars without gas formation. The bacteria produces both exo and endo toxins although the role of these toxins has not been fully...

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2011-03-04 17:38:30

Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease with a 40 to 50 nm enveloped RNA virus with positive sense of the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted by the bite of female mosquitoes and is found in tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa, but not in Asia. Primates and a few kinds of mosquitoes are the only known hosts. The origin of the disease is most likely Africa. From there it was introduced to South America through the slave trade in the 16th century. There...

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2011-02-23 21:21:50

Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus is a mosquito-borne viral pathogen that causes Venezuelan equine encephalitis or encephalomyelitis (VEE). It can affect all equine species, such as horses, donkeys, and zebras. Equines may suddenly die or show progressive central nervous system disorders after infection. It is contractible by humans and will usually experience flu-like symptoms when infected. People with a weak immune system can become seriously ill or die. It is transmitted primarily...

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2011-02-23 20:38:02

Rinderpest (also cattle plague) is an infectious viral disease of cattle, domestic buffalo, and some species of wildlife. It is characterized by fever, oral erosions, diarrhea, lymphoid necrosis, and high mortality. The last confirmed case was in 2001. In 2011 it should be announced that a global eradication of rinderpest was complete. The term comes from the German language meaning cattle-plague. The rinderpest virus is closely related to measles and canine distemper viruses. It is a...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.