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Latest biologist Stories

violence shaped the male face
2014-06-09 11:14:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Throughout history, men have had a well-earned reputation for violence and a new study in the journal Biological Reviews has concluded that masculine facial features evolved as a result of that violence. The new study focused on the faces of our australopith ancestors and how those faces evolved to protect us against punches. "The australopiths were characterized by a suite of traits that may have improved fighting ability,...

Genetic Mix Of Bacterial Diversity Found In One Milliliter Of Sea Water
2014-04-25 11:33:10

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Countless marine microbes called Prochlorococcus are the primary basis for most ocean food webs, yet microbiologists know very little about the diversity with this group of photosynthetic bacteria. A new study, published in the journal Science, describes hundreds of subpopulations of these essential marine bacteria. An international team of researchers were able to identify the different subgroups through a comprehensive genomic...

Kleiber's Law Helps Explain The Shape Of Evolution
2014-02-18 06:34:32

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During its lifetime, the heart of a mouse beats about the same number of times as an elephant. However, the mouse only lives about a year, while the elephant might live to the age of 70. Scientists have also observed that small plants and animals mature faster than large ones, and that nature has created radically different forms for life—from the loose-limbed beauty of a flowering tree to the fearful symmetry of a tiger....

Biofluorescence In Fish
2014-01-09 15:16:51

[ Watch the Video: Strange Lights In The Deep, Dark Ocean? ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study in the journal PLOS ONE has revealed biofluorescence in over 180 fish species and opened the door to the discovery of new fluorescent proteins that could be used in biomedical research. When organisms biofluoresce, they absorb light, convert it, and send it back out as a different color. "We've long known about biofluorescence underwater in organisms like...

2013-11-11 21:31:03

Engineering has always taken cues from biology. Natural organisms and systems have done well at evolving to perform tasks and achieve objectives within the limits set by nature and physics. That is one of the reasons Anette Hosoi, professor of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, studies snails. Snails can move in any direction—horizontally, vertically, and upside down—on various surfaces, be it sand, shells, tree barks or slick walls and smooth glass....

Conservation Biologists Work Very Hard According To Study
2013-08-13 12:24:30

University of Nottingham An international study of the work habits of conservation biologists suggests that they do work very hard — producing a substantial amount of work late at night and over weekends. The results have been published in an editorial article for the scientific journal Biological Conservation. The research, by Dr Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC), Dr Richard Primack of Boston University and Dr Lian Pin Koh of Princeton...

Simple Moss Plants Outperform Us By Gene Number
2013-08-05 11:28:48

AlphaGalileo Foundation At the genetic level, mosses are more complex than humans: A group of German, Belgian and Japanese scientists, coordinated by Professor Ralf Reski from the University of Freiburg, Germany, published a new study where they describe 32,275 protein-encoding genes from the moss Physcomitrella patens. This is about 10,000 genes more than the human genome contains. Mosses are tiny plants with a simple body plan: They have no roots, no flowers and do not produce seeds....

Internet Technology Records, Preserves Sounds Of Species
2013-07-16 08:39:11

[LISTEN TO AUDIO: Sound Of The Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi Frog] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has been historically difficult to monitor and identify the thousands of species living in tropical ecosystems. But using newly developed recording systems, researchers are now doing so much more easily. Using automated recording stations placed in natural habitats, researchers have captured the sounds of tropical birds, monkeys, frogs and insects throughout...

Biologists Create Squamate Reptile Family Tree
2013-05-09 18:14:59

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Those feeling as if there had been something missing in this world can rest easily tonight: A George Washington University (GWU) biologist and a team of researchers have finally finished the first large-scale evolutionary tree of every known squamate in the world. Squamates are reptiles such as snakes and larger lizards. This project had been underway since 2008, but according to GWU the last five years have been particularly...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'