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Latest Biology Stories

2014-07-07 10:11:17

McGill University Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University and McGill University Health Centre have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumour cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma. The SUMO family proteins modify other proteins and the SUMOylation of proteins are critical for many cellular processes. Identifying SUMO’s role in the cancer cell...

First Antibodies To Treat Cancer In Dogs Developed
2014-07-07 03:10:21

University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna Nearly every second dog develops cancer from the age of ten years onward. A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs. A very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not been available for animals so far. Scientists at the inter-university Messerli Research Institute of the Vetmeduni Vienna, the Medical University of Vienna, and the University of Vienna have developed, for the first time,...

2014-07-07 09:51:49

Science in Public Some viruses can hide in our bodies for decades. They make ‘fake’ human proteins that trick our immune cells into thinking ‘everything is awesome’, there’s nothing to see here. Now researchers at the Imaging Centre of Excellence at Monash and Melbourne Universities have determined the basic structure of one of the two known families of these deceptive proteins. Using synchrotron light and working with a common virus that lives in people happily and for...

2014-07-07 09:48:40

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Alas, the thankless pseudogene. Dysfunctional, unloved and seemingly of little use, these poor-cousin relatives of genes have lost their protein-coding abilities. They contain material not essential for an organism's survival and are the "last stop" for removal of genomic waste. Not any more. The pseudogene's day may have arrived thanks to scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Han Liang, Ph.D.,...

2014-07-07 09:45:20

UC San Diego Biologists at UC San Diego have solved a long-standing mystery concerning the way plants reduce the numbers of their breathing pores in response to rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. In a paper published in this week’s early online edition of Nature, they report the discovery of a new genetic pathway in plants, made up of four genes from three different gene families that control the density of breathing pores—or “stomata”—in plant leaves in response...

Legislative Measures Needed To Keep Illegal Wild Elephant Trade At Bay
2014-07-07 09:48:15

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In recent years, legislation passed in Thailand has successfully cracked down on the illegal elephant trade, but a new report from the conservation organization TRAFFIC has suggested that more legislation and measures are needed to further reduce the threat to elephants. The new report said that many elephants are captured in neighboring Myanmar, brutally tamed, and then smuggled across the border into Thailand, where they are used to...

Study Of Sociable Weavers Shows Everybody Needs Good Neighbors
2014-07-07 03:56:07

The University of Sheffield A new insight into one of the biggest questions in science – why some animals, including humans, work together to maintain a common good – has been achieved by scientists at the University of Sheffield. Sociable weavers, a highly social and co-operative breeding bird from the savannahs of southern Africa, build the largest nests of any bird, housing colonies of up to several hundred birds that can often weigh tonnes and last for decades. The massive...

2014-07-07 08:28:38

MALVERN, Pa., July 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reaction Biology Corporation ("RBC") announced today that it has been awarded a Phase I SBIR grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences to create a database of epigenetic drug interactions. The grant will help fund an examination of the interaction of over 1400 FDA-Approved drugs and drug-like compounds with over 30 epigenetic modifying enzymes. The project will begin immediately at RBC's lab facilities, and will...

2014-07-07 08:28:34

LONG ISLAND, N.Y., July 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Last week IneedMD Inc.'s CEO Dr. Govindan Gopinathan MD and CTO Robert Riola met with Congressman Steve Israel, Representative of New York's 3rd District. A growing employer in the region, IneedMD will be launching the distribution of its game changing EKG technology, the EKG Glove, from its Long Island location. The EKG Glove, a one-time use, disposable product, eliminates the risk of hospital acquired infections, a major problem now in...

2014-07-07 08:27:57

Clinical Activity of G-202 to be presented at session for Treatment for Intermediate-Advanced Stage Disease SAN ANTONIO, July 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- GenSpera, Inc. (OTCQB: GNSZ), a leader in developing prodrug therapeutics for the treatment of cancer, announces that interim data from the G-202 Phase I and Phase II trials in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients will be presented at the Fifth Annual Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert (APPLE) Meeting to be held July 11-13(th)...


Latest Biology Reference Libraries

Belgian Blue Cattle
2014-07-09 14:37:46

The Belgian Blue is a breed of beef cattle originating in Belgium. It was developed in the 1800s by crossbreeding local cattle with a Shorthorn breed from the United Kingdom. It is quite possible that the Charolais cattle was also used in the development of the Belgian Blue. A modern breed of the Belgian blue was developed in the 1950s by Professor Hanset while working at an artificial insemination facility in the Liege province. The breed was introduced to the United States in 1978 by...

Arouquesa Cattle
2014-07-04 10:20:33

The Arouquesa is a breed of cattle from Portugal and is in protected geographical status. Its range of habitat is restricted to the Northern Portuguese districts of Viseu, Aveiro, Porto and Braga. It is a small breed with the cow only reaching a height of about 48 inches and weighing between 790 and 950 pounds. The bull is slightly bigger at about 52 inches high and will weigh about the same as the cow. The color is a light brown, but the bull will be a little darker than the cow. There...

Ankole-Watusi Cattle
2014-07-04 10:10:48

The Ankole-Watusi is a breed of cattle native to Africa. It is also known as the Anokle longhorn. The Ankole-Watusi have been illustrated on ancient rock paintings, Egyptian art and on pyramid walls. A breed called the Sanga spread to eastern Africa and became the base stock for many of the African breeds of cattle. The Nkole tribe’s Sanga cattle is called the Ankole and in Rwanda and Burundi it is called the Watusi. The original Ankole-Watusi cattle owned by chiefs and kings were...

Working horse
2014-06-14 10:44:57

The Fouta is a breed of horse originating from Senegal, West Africa. Also known as the Foutanke, the horse was developed from crossing the Fleuve and M’Bayer breeds resulting in a light work horse. The Fleuve horse is also found in Senegal, West Africa. This light horse was bred from crossing Barb horses with local ponies. The M’Bayer also evolved from the Barb horse and originated in the Baol region of Senegal. This breed is usually bay or chestnut. The average horse in Senegal is...

Torrey Pine, Pinus torreyana
2014-05-19 09:27:13

Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana) is found only in California in the county of San Diego with one of the Channel Islands. This pine is the rarest and is considered endangered with only about 7000 trees in San Diego and 2000 left on the island of Santa Rosa. The Torrey pine grows from 200-500 feet above sea level and grows to heights of 26-49 feet tall with trunk diameters between one and two feet. The trunk of this tree can be straight, crooked, and often leaning due to the prevailing winds....

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.