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Latest Biomass Stories

Southern Ocean Sampling Shows Travels Of Marine Microbes
2013-09-18 12:55:33

University of New South Wales By collecting water samples up to six kilometers below the surface of the Southern Ocean, UNSW researchers have shown for the first time the impact of ocean currents on the distribution and abundance of marine micro-organisms. The sampling was the deepest ever undertaken from the Australian icebreaker, RSV Aurora Australis. Microbes are so tiny they are invisible to the naked eye, but they are vital to sustaining life on earth, producing most of the...

Coffee Grounds Could Be A Promising Energy Resource For The Future
2013-09-10 05:05:14

[ Watch the Video: Biodiesel From Used Coffee Grounds ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A large percentage of people turn to coffee for energy to start their day, but new research suggests that the caffeinated beverage could also serve as fuel to power automobiles and appliances. Yang Liu of the University of Cincinnati’s College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) and colleagues report that an ingredient in old coffee grounds could be converted into...

Sharing Risks And Costs Of Biomass Crops
2013-09-05 09:48:08

University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences Farmers who grow corn and soybeans can take advantage of government price support programs and crop insurance, but similar programs are not available for those who grow biomass crops such as Miscanthus. A University of Illinois study recommends a framework for contracts between growers and biorefineries to help spell out expectations for sustainability practices and designate who will assume the risks and...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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