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Latest Biosecurity Stories

2008-11-13 03:00:16

A U.S. expert on bioethics says the question of who is 'essential' during a flu pandemic must be considered by emergency planners. Nancy Kass, deputy director of Public Health for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, said truck drivers, communications personnel and utility workers should be considered essential along with doctors, nurses and firefighters. "When preparing for a severe pandemic flu it is crucial for leaders to recognize that if the public has limited or no access...

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2008-10-12 09:15:00

Calling it the "nuttiest thing" he'd ever heard, Defense Secretary Robert Gates laughed off claims by Indonesia's health minister that shipments of bird flu virus to a U.S. research laboratory had been halted for fear Washington might use them to make biological weapons. However, buried deep inside an 86-page supplement to the United States' export regulations is a single sentence that prohibits U.S. exports of vaccines for avian bird flu to five countries designated as state sponsors of...

2008-08-22 15:00:29

By CARPINTER, Bernard BIOSECURITY NEW ZEALAND is preparing to use poison and carp to fight a devastating lake weed. It plans to start on Lake Tutira, north of Napier, but fishermen are worried that the campaign could spoil the trout fishery on the lake and associated streams. The weed hydrilla has been found in Tutira and three other small lakes nearby. Hydrilla crowds out native plants and forms dense mats. "If it spread to some of our iconic lakes like Taupo or Waikaremoana the...

2008-06-18 15:00:45

SAN DIEGO, June 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Kansas researchers and companies excel in the human health biosciences, and $3.7 million in new Kansas Bioscience Authority (KBA) investments in that sector will support cutting-edge innovations for the treatment of cancer, HIV, and osteoporosis, as well as in pharmaceutical development. "Kansas has tremendous human-health research capabilities and strong corporate clustering, and we're using those strengths to address critical national and international...

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2008-02-29 11:59:59

Researchers have developed a new technology that can simultaneously screen thousands of samples of food or water for several dangerous food-borne pathogens in one to two hours. The technique, which has potential biosecurity and food safety applications, also can estimate the amount of microbes present and whether they pose an active health risk. This could help neutralize potential threats and improve food processing techniques, said Arun Bhunia, a professor of food science at Purdue...

2006-04-21 19:28:38

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Infectious disease experts and the American Civil Liberties Union raised concerns on Friday about an agreement that would allow U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and customs agents to detain anyone who looked sick with bird flu. The memorandum of understanding, a copy of which was provided to Reuters, also provides for Customs and Border Protection agents to give personal details of airline...

2006-02-26 18:04:13

By Jennifer Kwan TORONTO (Reuters) - A group of Canadian academics worry that post-9/11 fears of bioterrorism will undermine legitimate scientific work and they want to set up a global advisory group that will act as a watchdog to prevent science being misused to produce biological weapons. "Bioterrorists require darkness to succeed," said Peter Singer, director of the Joint Center for Bioethics at the University of Toronto, which published a report calling for global network of...

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2005-10-31 06:47:42

CAIRO, Egypt -- The bacteria lie dormant, freeze-dried in sealed ampules, in a refrigerator on a teeming university campus beside the Nile. They're among Earth's most common germs - clostridia perfringens, a cause of food poisoning, a specimen for research. But this pathogen can also be a weapon: Iraqi scientists worked for years to mobilize this "Agent G" for Saddam Hussein's wars. In an America nervous over bioterrorism, new laws clamp controls on clostridia and other "select agents,"...

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2005-06-29 00:30:00

WASHINGTON -- A scientific article that says terrorists could poison thousands of people through the milk supply - withheld at first at the government's request - is being published despite continuing objections after the National Academy of Sciences concluded it wouldn't help attackers. The study by Lawrence M. Wein and Yifan Liu of Stanford University discusses such questions as how terrorists could release botulinum toxin into the U.S. milk supply and what effective amounts might be....