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Latest Biota Stories

2008-09-13 18:00:12

A GRANT scheme - the first of its kind in England - is being launched today in a bid to help declining woodland bird species in the North East. The Forestry Commission in partnership with the RSPB is offering financial support to landowners and managers to improve the habitat for 14 vulnerable species, including redstart, tree pipit, spotted flycatcher and marsh tit. The UK's woodland bird population has fallen by 20% in the last 25 years. Some species, such as the lesser redpoll and...

2008-08-30 09:00:36

By Staff Report TROY -- This is a log of the questions called in or brought into the Horticulture HelpLine run by the Miami County Master Gardeners. The help line operates from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays through the end of August. Master Gardeners are available on these Mondays to answer questions on the ground floor of the courthouse in Troy. The number is (937) 440-3945. Jack Hepler, Ed Smith and Marian Moeckel helped with the HelpLine on Aug. 11. Q: I have a neighbor who has a...

2008-08-29 03:00:30

By Teresa Stepzinski BRUNSWICK, Ga. - Tropical Storm Fay destroyed fewer loggerhead sea turtle nests on Georgia beaches than originally feared, state wildlife biologists said Monday. About 8 percent of the state's nests were lost, according to preliminary assessments. Georgia Department of Natural Resources biologists and sea turtle patrol volunteers conducted the weekend surveys on all the beaches except Blackbeard Island. "We lost about 106 nests ... Luckily, it wasn't as bad as...

2008-08-26 06:00:00

By Linn Mills Here are some problems that are on gardeners' minds. Noisy yard: The screeching noise you hear this time of year comes from male cicadas sending out mating calls. Females lay eggs in twigs and larvae later hatch, drop and burrow into the ground, where they live a few years only to repeat the cycle. The noise will soon subside. Ripe watermelons: They are ready to eat when the melon belly becomes yellow where it touches the ground; the curly tendrils where the melon attaches to...

2008-08-23 15:00:22

Federal officials confirm 10 polar bears, an unusually large number, have recently been seen swimming in open Alaskan waters. Arctic ice melts in the Chukchi Sea are the suspected cause of the bears swimming toward either land or more remote icebergs, The New York Times reported Saturday. Such sightings were rare until 2004 but have grown more common as polar bears hunt for seals. "It's not unusual for bears to be swimming," said Susanne Miller, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife...

2008-08-18 09:00:46

SKYBRIDGE DEVELOPMENT CORP. (TSX-V: SBD) is pleased to report that it continues to intersect the Blue Caribou Copper Zone on the western extension of the current series of sections previously announced (July 16, 2008). Drilling has also intersected altered, mineralized rock with assays pending on the 8km long Blue Caribou Gold Zone trend on its 100% owned Blue Caribou Project in Nunavut. The Blue Caribou Copper Zone represents mineralized intervals with assays over a total 800m strike...

2008-08-04 03:00:15

By Jennifer McLain EL MONTE - County officials still don't know what killed more than 50 ducks in the San Gabriel River in July. The dead ducks were found by a West Covina bird-watcher last month, and that prompted an investigation by the county's Department of Public Works. "After reviewing the early results of water and soil samples, we still don't know the exact cause of these avian deaths," said Kerjon Lee, spokesman for the County of Los Angeles Department of Public...

2008-07-30 15:00:40

NORWAY - The Western Foothills Land Trust invites community volunteers to enter into battle with the invasive "Rosa Multiflora" on Roberts Farm Preserve from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 2. Multiflora rose is an aggressive colonizer of open unplowed land and is highly successful on forest edges. The prolific seed producer can create extremely dense, impenetrable thickets that crowd out other vegetation and inhibit regrowth of native plants, according to the Maine Extension...

2008-07-27 12:00:32

By Tim Feran, The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio Jul. 27--Once a month, Home & Garden visits a central Ohioan's home to peek at the room most readily associated with his or her line of work or play. Jack Hanna calls Rebecca Rose "Miss Rain Forest," partly because of her love of the jungles of the world and partly because of her lush and dense backyard, which just so happens to be located on a street appropriately named Amazon. Rose, the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium's field conservation...

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2008-07-21 08:40:00

An apparent set of conjoined twin birds - an incredibly rare find - has been discovered in Arkansas, authorities said. The bodies of the barn swallows, which are attached at the hip by skin and possibly muscle tissue, are being sent to the Smithsonian Institution for examination and confirmation, Arkansas wildlife officials said Friday. "I can't even say it's one in a million - it's probably more than that," said Karen Rowe, an ornithologist with the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission. -...


Latest Biota Reference Libraries

Montezuma Pine, Pinus montezumae
2014-07-15 13:27:17

Montezuma pine (Pinus montezumae) is native to Mexico and Central America and grows in the mountain ranges. This tree is known as ocote by the locals of Mexico. This tree has been planted successfully at mid altitudes in South Africa and Queensland, Australia, and at high altitudes in Kenya, Malawi, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Bolivia. Trees planted in New Zealand and New South Wales, Australia have done well at sea level. The Montezuma pine grows at 6,562-10,500 feet above sea level where...

Macedonian Pine, Pinus peuce
2014-07-15 13:08:24

Macedonian Pine (Pinus peuce) is native to Macedonia, Bulgaria, Albania, Montenegro, Kosovo, southwest Serbia, as well as the extreme north of Greece. This pine has been neutralized and grows in Eastern Finland. This pine grows best at altitudes between 3,281feet and 7,218 feet with a few growing as low as 1,969 feet and as high as 7,546 feet. This pine tolerates shade as well as extreme cold, and grows in rocky soils that are acidic and poor in nutrients. This tree grows to heights...

Japanese White Pine, Pinus parviflora
2014-07-15 12:15:14

Japanese White Pine (Pinus parviflora) is native to Japan and found growing in Kokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Shikaku; and South Korea, and Utsurio-To. The Japanese call it the Japanese five-needle pine. The Japanese White Pine grows from sea level up to 8,202 feet, but grows best between 3,281 feet and 4,921 feet. Dwarfism sets in when the trees grow above sub-alpine levels. This pine grows on steep, rocky slopes and prefers well-drained soils and full sun although it does not like intense...

Chinese White Pine, Pinus armandii
2014-07-14 16:49:23

Chinese White Pine (Pinus armandii) is native to China as well as northern Burma. This pine is known as Mount Hua pine in Chinese. This pine grows at altitudes between 3,281 and 10,830 feet in light sandy to medium soils that is acidic and well-drained as this tree can tolerate drought. This tree grows to heights of 115 feet with a trunk diameter that measures 3 feet 3 inches. The bark is grayish brown when immature and matures to blackish brown to grayish red brown. The trunk will have...

Ocote Pine, Pinus oocarpa
2014-05-16 09:55:29

Ocote pine (Pinus oocarpa) is native to Mexico and Central America. This tree is also known as the Mexican yellow pine, hazelnut pine, pino Amarillo, and pino avellano. This pine is closely related to the pinus greggii and pinus patula. This pine grows at altitudes of 3000-7000 feet above sea level while in El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua it grows at lower altitudes of 2600 feet. In poor soils, the tree will only grow between 32.8 and 49.2 feet tall and up to 39.3 feet in shallow soil...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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