Quantcast
Giant Extinct Kangaroos Did Not Hop

Giant Extinct Kangaroos Did Not Hop

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Modern kangaroos are known for their hopping abilities, but that doesn’t mean we should assume that all ancient relatives of the marsupial used this mode of transportation. According to a...

Latest Bipedalism Stories

dinosaur arms bird wings
2014-10-02 08:08:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The scientific community has accepted the idea that birds evolved from a branch of the dinosaur tree. What evolutionary biologists haven't figure out, however, is how wrists evolved from straight to bent and hyperflexible. This is a crucial adaptation which allowed birds to fold their wings neatly against their bodies when not flying. How this adaptation came to be has been the subject of hot debate between developmental biologists...

footfall sequences
2014-07-18 03:05:22

The University of Texas at Austin Contradicting earlier claims, “The Family That Walks on All Fours,” a group of quadrupedal humans made famous by a 2006 BBC documentary, have simply adapted to their inability to walk upright and do not represent an example of backward evolution, according to new research by Liza Shapiro, an anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin. Five siblings in the family, who live in a remote corner of Turkey, walk exclusively on their hands and...

Did A Dexterous Hand Or An Agile Foot Evolve First
2013-10-07 11:16:58

RIKEN Resolving a long-standing mystery in human evolution, new research from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute indicates that early hominids developed finger dexterity and tool use ability before the development of bipedal locomotion. Combining monkey and human behavior, brain imaging, and fossil evidence, a research team led by neurobiologist Dr. Atsushi Iriki and including Dr. Gen Suwa, an anthropologist from the University of Tokyo Museum, have overturned the common assumption that...

2013-07-26 11:19:51

According to a new study, led by University of Texas at Austin anthropologists Gabrielle A. Russo and Liza Shapiro, the 9- to 7-million-year-old ape from Italy did not, in fact, walk habitually on two legs. The findings refute a long body of evidence, suggesting that Oreopithecus had the capabilities for bipedal (moving on two legs) walking. The study, published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Human Evolution, confirms that anatomical features related to habitual upright,...

Bipedal Rodents Survive In The Desert Using Jumps, Hops And Skips
2013-07-07 18:35:07

Society for Experimental Biology [ Video 1 ] [ Video 2 ] Researchers have found that bipedal desert rodents manage to compete with their quadrupedal counterparts by using a diverse set of jumps, hops and skips. A new study, to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting in Valencia on July 6, suggests that it is this unpredictable movement that allows the bipedal rodents to coexist in Old World deserts with quadrupedal rodents. Research headed by Talia Moore at...

Terrain Played Evolutionary Role To Upright Walking In Humans
2013-05-24 13:22:24

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Archaeologists from the University of York have challenged evolutionary theories about why our ancestors began walking upright. Publishing research in the journal Antiquity, the team wrote that our upright gait may have begun in the rugged landscape of East and South Africa, which was a terrain shaped by volcanoes and shifting tectonic plates. "Our research shows that bipedalism may have developed as a response to the terrain,...

2013-03-13 15:52:17

When, how and why modern humans first stood up and walked on two legs is considered to be one of the greatest missing links in our evolutionary history. Scientists have gone to the far ends of the earth — and the wonderful creatures in it - to look for answers to why we walk the way we walk. In the latest such search, researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg (South Africa) have taken a closer look at bipedal kangaroos and wallabies and how they move...

Backaches Evolved Once We Started To Walk Upright
2013-02-15 19:08:09

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Feeling like your feet are a little sore or you have a backache after a day of shopping or walking around town? Well, scientists now say you can blame that on evolution. Bruce Latimer, an anthropologist from the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, says adapting to upright walking has resulted in physical challenges that affect most humans. "If an engineer were given the task to design the human body, he...

Meerkats Climb To Hide From Predators
2013-02-05 18:13:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online [ Watch the Video: Meerkat Predator-Scanning Behaviour Is Altruistic ] In studying the behaviors of animals, biologists are often looking to see if a species exhibits more individualistic or collectivist tendencies in their typical habits. When foraging for food, meerkats often stand on their hind legs or climb to a perch in an attempt to scan for predators and, upon spotting a threat, the animals let out a series of warning...

Early Human Ancestors May Have Walked And Climbed Trees
2013-01-01 09:48:25

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many researchers believe that one of the pivotal events in becoming human was the development of terrestrial bipedalism, or the ability to walk on two legs. Much has been made of our ancestors "coming down out of the trees." After all, the majority of our living primate relatives — for example, the great apes — still spend a great deal of their time in trees. In the primate family, humans are the only branch devoted to the...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.