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Latest Bird flight Stories

Flapping Baby Birds Provide Clues To Origin Of Flight
2014-09-02 03:34:43

By Robert Sanders, University of California, Berkeley How did the earliest birds take wing? Did they fall from trees and learn to flap their forelimbs to avoid crashing? Or did they run along the ground and pump their “arms” to get aloft? The answer is buried 150 million years in the past, but a new University of California, Berkeley, study provides a new piece of evidence – birds have an innate ability to maneuver in midair, a talent that could have helped their ancestors learn...

wood thrush migration
2014-08-23 03:00:15

Robin Heron, York University Juvenile songbirds on spring migration travel from overwintering sites in the tropics to breeding destinations thousands of kilometers away with no prior experience to guide them. Now, a new study out of York University has tracked these “student pilots” on their first long-haul flight and found significant differences between the timing of juvenile migration and that of experienced adults. “Juveniles departed later from their overwinter sites in...

bird migration
2014-08-06 03:00:10

The University of Chicago Medicine Every year, millions of birds make the journey from North America to Central and South America for the winter. But the evolutionary origins of this long-distance migration have remained opaque due to the complex geographic distributions of modern and ancient bird ranges. Now, a team of scientists from the University of Chicago have developed a new method to reveal the ancestral ranges of New World birds, and discovered that bird migration in the...

hummingbird beats helicopter
2014-08-02 04:17:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Hummingbird wings are more efficient than even the highest-quality helicopter blades when it comes to generating lift, according to new research appearing in the current issue of the Journal of the Royal Society: Interface. However, experiments conducted by Stanford University professor David Lentink indicate that the gap between nature and human engineering is closing. While the best hummingbird was found to be over 20 percent...

Swainsons thrush
2014-07-23 02:00:32

University of British Columbia Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists. "Instead of taking well-trodden paths through fertile areas, these birds choose to scale mountains and cross deserts," says UBC researcher Kira Delmore. Delmore harnessed a flock of B.C. Swainson's thrushes with tiny geolocating backpacks to map their routes as they migrated south...

2014-02-19 12:22:17

Small Flying Vehicles, Complete with Flapping Wings, may Emerge from Study of Fruit Bats WASHINGTON, Feb. 19, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- By exploring how creatures in nature are able to fly by flapping their wings, Virginia Tech researchers hope to apply that knowledge toward designing small flying vehicles known as "micro air vehicles" with flapping wings. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130627/DC39790LOGO) More than 1,000 species of bats have hand membrane wings,...

Birds Of A Feather: V Formation Of Bird Flight Explained
2014-01-16 04:52:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online By fitting data loggers onto a flock of birds, researchers from the Royal Veterinary College in London have discovered why the creatures typically fly in a distinctive V formation, according to research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. According to BBC News, Dr. Steven Portugal and his colleagues discovered that birds strategically position themselves in the optimal position, gaining lift from the bird in...

Molecular Clock Of The Common Buzzard
2013-10-23 09:27:24

University of Bielefeld Bielefeld biologists reveal the influence of genes on dispersal behavior Be it hibernation or the routes of migratory birds: all animal behavior that is subject to annual rhythms is controlled by a molecular clock. Although this has been known for a long time, in many cases it is still unclear how far genes are involved in setting this internal clock. Up to now, this also applied to the common buzzard and its migration from parental breeding grounds. Behavioral...

Understanding Origins Of Flight With Wind Tunnel
2013-09-18 10:40:09

[ Watch The Video: Wind Tunnel Helps Understand Bird Flight ] Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Recent research has uncovered the evolutionary origin of birds, as the limbs of certain dinosaurs transformed into wings and gave these creatures the ability to fly. Scientists at the University of Southampton have taken this research one step farther and now say they understand how feathered dinosaurs developed the ability to use these wings for flight. For years...

Avian Evolution: How Raptor Limbs Became Bird Wings
2013-09-18 06:09:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists are certain that sometime around 150 million years ago birds originated from a group of small, meat-eating theropod dinosaurs called maniraptorans. According to recent studies conducted around the world, the maniraptorans were very bird-like, with feathers, hollow bones, small body sizes and high metabolic rates. What remains unclear is at what point the forelimbs evolved into wings, making it possible for the maniraptorans...


Latest Bird flight Reference Libraries

Microraptor
2012-03-21 23:43:50

Microraptor, meaning “small thief,” is a genus of dromaeosaurid dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Period (120 million years ago). This small, four-winged animal was first discovered in the Jiufotang Formation in Liaoning, China, with more than two dozen specimens unearthed. There are two known species of Microraptor. The type species, M. zhaoianus, has been hotly debated for years. It was initially placed in the genus Archaeoraptor before a more accurate description placed it in the...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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