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Latest Bird migration Stories

2008-06-24 12:02:37

U.S. scientists say many birds are migrating earlier because of global warming, but some might not be able to keep pace with changing climate. Researchers at Boston University and the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences analyzed changes in the timing of spring migrations of 32 species of birds along the coast of eastern Massachusetts since 1970. Their findings show eight of 32 bird species are passing by Cape Cod significantly earlier on their annual trek north than they were 38 years...

2008-06-24 06:02:31

By Jeff Martin Scientists are increasingly concerned about the number of birds killed by running into power lines and wind turbines, said Al Manville, a senior wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but there are reports of success in preventing such incidents -- at least in the case of the power lines. More lines and turbines are planned in coming years, which could put several species of birds at risk, Manville said. "We've got to address our carbon footprint...

2008-06-21 12:00:12

PORT ROWAN, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - June 21, 2008) - Canada's Environment Minister, John Baird, and Canada's Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and Member of Parliament for Haldimand - Norfolk, Diane Finley, today announced $677,037 in funding to protect wild bird species at-risk, their nests and their habitat. Work will be carried out by Bird Studies Canada, a not-for-profit organization that advances the understanding, appreciation and conservation of wild birds and their habitat in...

2008-06-18 18:00:19

By DAN SVINGEN Unusual. Odd. Bizarre. All words, all adjectives and all descriptive of the spring that is quickly ebbing away. Now please, do not misunderstand. My choice of modifiers is by no means a criticism of our current season. After all, those same adjectives, along with the phrase "devilishly handsome," are oft employed by others to describe me. Like many happenings in the natural world, this spring's unusual birding was no doubt strongly influenced by weather patterns. Weather...

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2008-04-10 10:00:00

Migratory birds make mistakes in terms of direction, but not distance. These are the findings of a team of ornithologists and ecologists from the University of Marburg, the Ornithological Society in Bavaria and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), writing in the Journal of Ornithology. The scientists assessed several thousand reports of Asian birds from the leaf-warbler and thrush families that had strayed to Europe. They discovered that the distance between the breeding...

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2008-04-04 07:30:00

Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute report that bats significantly reduce insect abundance and damage on plants. In a lowland tropical rainforest in Panama, bats can consume roughly twice as many plant-eating insects as do birds. This landmark study in the journal Science is the first to compare the ability of bats and birds to protect plants via insect predation in a natural forest ecosystem.A previous study by the authors suggested that bats were underestimated...

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2008-02-14 11:31:08

A Conservation group is optimistic after receiving news that 84 spoon-billed sandpipers were spotted on the coast in Myanmar. The World Conservation Union states that the bird is endangered, with only 200 to 300 pairs remaining. A few months prior to the latest discovery of the bird with its distinctive spoon-like bill, Russian researchers reported a 70 percent drop in the number spotted in their normal breeding sites in Siberia also noting that none were seen this year in Bangladesh, their...

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2008-02-07 14:45:00

Lice from 1,000-year-old mummies in Peru may unravel important clues about a different sort of passage: the migration patterns of America's earliest humans, a new University of Florida study suggests."It's kind of quirky that a parasite we love to hate can actually inform us how we traveled around the globe," said David Reed, an assistant curator of mammals at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus and one of the study's authors.DNA sequencing found the strain of lice to be...

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2008-01-31 11:25:00

Eurasian reed warblers captured during their spring migrations and released after being flown 1,000 kilometers to the east can correct their travel routes and head for their original destinations, researchers report online on January 31st in Current Biology, a publication of Cell Press. The new evidence suggests that the birds have true navigation, meaning that they can identify at least two coordinates that roughly correspond to geographic latitude and longitude. The findings challenge the...

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2007-05-16 12:30:00

WASHINGTON -- Birds that once flourished in suburban skies, including robins, bluebirds and crows, have been devastated by West Nile virus, a study found. Populations of seven species have had dramatic declines across the continent since West Nile emerged in the United States in 1999, according to a first-of-its-kind study. The research, to be published Thursday by the journal Nature, compared 26 years of bird breeding surveys to quantify what had been known anecdotally. "We're seeing a...


Latest Bird migration Reference Libraries

38_5e94e5ed06f251e2a48bb0af250cedde
2006-03-09 11:12:33

The Green Pygmy Goose (Nettapus pulchellus) is a small perching duck found in southern New Guinea and northern Australia. It is largely resident, apart from dispersion during the wet season. The habitat is well vegetated lowland lagoons and other permanent fresh waters.

36_d0f100dde21102131ebb86ef946f80e8
2005-06-14 12:44:59

The Canada goose (Branta canadensis), also called the Canadian Goose in North America, belongs to the Branta genus of geese. This genus contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey Anser species. The species name, canadensis, is a New Latin word meaning "of Canada". The black head and neck with white "chinstrap" distinguish this goose from all except the Barnacle goose, but the latter has a black breast and grey, rather than brownish, body plumage. There...

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2009-04-01 13:32:49

The Red Knot (Calidris canutus), or Knot in Europe, is a species of bird found in the tundra and Arctic mountains in the far north of Canada, Europe and Russia. North American birds migrate to coastal Europe and South America, while European birds migrate to Africa, Papua New Guinea, Australia and New Zealand. This species has an extensive range and a large population of about 1.1 million individuals. There are six subspecies. The adult is 9 to 10.25 inches in length with an 18.5 to 20.8...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'