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Latest Bird migration Stories

30ce0c8eff315442f6efe8a5f913eba91
2010-05-09 07:30:00

A team from the University of Cantabria (UC) has studied the contribution that internal migration by foreign people living in Spain made to the process of overall provincial convergence between 1996 and 2005. The main reasons for foreign migrants moving between regions were found to be primarily employment-related rather than to do with residential choice. Between 1996 and 2005, the proportion of internal migrations in Spain made by foreigners grew from 3% to 26% of the total. By 2008, three...

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2010-04-30 06:25:53

When it comes to brains, bigger is not always better Researchers at Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF, a Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona-affiliated center) shed new light on the evolution of brain size in birds. Scientists have known for some time that migratory birds have smaller brains than their resident relatives. Now a new study looks into the reasons and concludes that the act of migrating leads to a reduced brain size. Authors point to...

2010-04-21 13:50:27

The results of genetic studies on migratory birds substantiate the theory that in the case of a continued global warming, and within only a few generations, migratory birds will - subject to strong selection and microevolution - at first begin to fly shorter distances and at a later stage, stop migrating, and will thus become so-called "residents". In a selection experiment with blackcaps from southwest Germany, Francisco Pulido and Peter Berthold at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology...

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2010-02-24 10:55:00

The United Nations reported on Wednesday that several countries, including Russia, Iran and China, are working together to bring back the Siberian Crane form the brink of extinction. The pure white, 55-inch tall crane is considered to be critically endangered with a population of less than 3,500 individuals left. But, with the help of the international community, "the future of the Siberian crane is looking brighter," said Claire Mirande, director of the Siberian Crane Wetland Project. The...

2010-02-23 14:38:21

Iron containing short nerve branches in the upper beak of birds may serve as a magnetometer to measure the vector of the Earth magnetic field (intensity and inclination) and not only as a magnetic compass, which shows the direction of the magnetic field lines. Already several years ago, the Frankfurt neurobiologists Dr.Gerta Fleissner and her husband Prof. Dr. Gnther Fleissner have discovered these structures in homing pigeons and have, in close cooperation with the experimental physicist...

bd3b4dd65af6593835cf6eb8f4a30b4e1
2010-02-17 10:18:17

Heavy migratory birds take shorter breaks and reach their breeding grounds faster Small migratory birds, like the garden warbler, must make stopovers on their journeys to their breeding grounds. When they have crossed extensive ecological barriers, such as deserts or oceans, they must land to replenish their fat reserves. A researcher from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and a team of Italian colleagues measured the duration of the stopovers made by garden warblers on an...

7a75c7adb50bb512dae3872d4a4cbd011
2010-02-12 09:31:50

Traveling long distances spurs the evolution of larger and pointier wings A University of Georgia study has found that monarch butterflies that migrate long distances have evolved significantly larger and more elongated wings than their stationary cousins, differences that are consistent with traits known to enhance flight ability in other migratory species. As part of a National Science Foundation and UGA-funded study, researchers in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources and...

2010-02-04 15:09:37

A study published today in Science, by researchers at Rothamsted Research (an institute of the BBSRC), the Met Office, the Natural Resources Institute, and the Universities of Exeter, Greenwich and York, sheds new light on the flight behaviors that enable insects to undertake long-distance migrations, and highlights the remarkable abilities of these insect migrants. Many insects avoid cold British winters by migrating south in autumn to over-wintering sites around the Mediterranean. Migrant...

b0d2ae2f9012243beb787b7d42980a071
2010-01-28 13:40:00

Migrating birds can and do keep their travel dates flexible, a new study published online on January 28th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, reveals. But in the case of pied flycatchers, at least, an earlier takeoff hasn't necessarily translated into an earlier arrival at their destination. It appears the problem is travel delays the birds are experiencing as a result of harsh weather conditions on the final leg of their journey through Europe. The discovery may in a sense be good...

e1a36bf32d8610389d5465d1401de9941
2010-01-12 14:10:00

Arctic terns migrating south for winter often take a rest for a few days off the coast of Newfoundland, before continuing their long journey south, according to the Associated Press. The region where the small birds take their break was disclosed for the first time on Tuesday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. While the migration from the Arctic to the Antarctic is a well-known journey for the Arctic tern, the stopover point had been previously unknown by scientists and bird...


Latest Bird migration Reference Libraries

38_5e94e5ed06f251e2a48bb0af250cedde
2006-03-09 11:12:33

The Green Pygmy Goose (Nettapus pulchellus) is a small perching duck found in southern New Guinea and northern Australia. It is largely resident, apart from dispersion during the wet season. The habitat is well vegetated lowland lagoons and other permanent fresh waters.

36_d0f100dde21102131ebb86ef946f80e8
2005-06-14 12:44:59

The Canada goose (Branta canadensis), also called the Canadian Goose in North America, belongs to the Branta genus of geese. This genus contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey Anser species. The species name, canadensis, is a New Latin word meaning "of Canada". The black head and neck with white "chinstrap" distinguish this goose from all except the Barnacle goose, but the latter has a black breast and grey, rather than brownish, body plumage. There...

45_2c0380c7e76515063dc4326285e9fbf8
2009-04-01 13:32:49

The Red Knot (Calidris canutus), or Knot in Europe, is a species of bird found in the tundra and Arctic mountains in the far north of Canada, Europe and Russia. North American birds migrate to coastal Europe and South America, while European birds migrate to Africa, Papua New Guinea, Australia and New Zealand. This species has an extensive range and a large population of about 1.1 million individuals. There are six subspecies. The adult is 9 to 10.25 inches in length with an 18.5 to 20.8...

30_83a8b18713d67d4a04be9572bfd2db22
2005-06-01 20:49:42

The Whooping Crane (Grus americana) is a very large crane and the tallest North American bird. Adult birds are white with a red crown and a long dark pointed bill. They have long dark legs which trail behind in flight and a long neck that is kept straight in flight. Black wing tips can be seen in flight. Immature birds are pale brown. Their breeding habitat is muskeg; the only known nesting location is Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada and its surrounding area. They nest on the...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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