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Birdsongs Automatically Decoded By Computer Scientists

Birdsongs Automatically Decoded By Computer Scientists

Queen Mary, University of London Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The...

Latest Bird vocalization Stories

It's Not All Sexual Selection
2014-03-05 14:54:45

University of Maryland Baltimore County Since the days of Darwin, scientists have considered bird song to be an exclusively male trait, resulting from sexual selection. Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the University of Melbourne in Australia, Leiden University in the Netherlands and The Australian National University says that's not the whole story. The team used information from several sources, including the Handbook of the Birds of...

ronan sea lion
2014-02-16 05:10:18

[ Watch the Video: Beat Keeping in a California Sea Lion ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The California sea lion that originally became an Internet sensation last year because of the way she bobbed her head in time with music was the focus of research presented by scientists Saturday at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Chicago. Ronan, who lives at Long Marine Laboratory at the University of...

2013-12-05 10:23:28

Attracting katydid females in the presence of a masking sound As darkness descends upon the tropical rainforests of Malaysia, male chirping katydids of the Mecopoda complex are just getting warmed up for their usual nightly concerts to woo the females. These nocturnal suitors are favoured for chirping in synchrony as a chorus; however, singing in time with one another is no easy task as they have to co-ordinate in the presence of the noisy serenades from a very closely related katydid...

Sparrows Display Personalities During Fights
2013-12-04 08:52:17

University of Washington Like humans, some song sparrows are more effusive than others, at least when it comes to defending their territories. New findings from the University of Washington show that consistent individual differences exist not only for how aggressive individual song sparrows are but also for how much they use their signals to communicate their aggressive intentions. The findings, published online Dec. 4 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show that while many birds...

Sea Lion Learns To Boogie Down
2013-04-02 04:56:19

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The first empirical evidence of an animal not capable of vocal mimicry that can keep the beat comes from a California sea lion that bobs her head in time to music. The findings of this study, published online in the Journal of Comparative Psychology, challenge current scientific theories, according to the authors. Those theories hold the ability to synchronize movements with sound is associated with the same brain mechanisms that...

Aggressive Sparrows Escalate Their Territorial Threats
2013-02-13 10:39:27

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study out of the University of Washington (UW) seems to build on a previous study reported on here at redOrbit only last month. The previous study, out of Duke University, relied upon a robotic ℠Frankensparrow´ to monitor sparrow behavior leading up to and during territorial brawls. The UW team wanted to learn about the threat signals given off by the defensive sparrow to a potential invader. As it turns out, song...

Higher Pitch Bird Songs Are Louder
2013-01-11 19:07:25

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Have you ever been to oh, let´s say, New York City or Chicago? Maybe Philadelphia or even downtown Fort Worth? If you have and you are, like me, a lover of city life and city residents, you will have noticed that the inhabitants of these cities move a little faster, have a little less patience and talk quite a bit louder. Is it the environment that drives these actions and behaviors? Does the city just attract these...

Songbirds Sing In 3D
2013-01-08 19:14:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Since both human and songbird infants learn vocal communication at an early age, the cognitive mechanisms behind bird songs have a rich history of groundbreaking research. However, an international team of scientists decided to take a deeper look into the physical mechanics behind birds´ vocalizations, according to a new study in the open access journal BMC Biology. "We know quite a bit about how the songbird brain...

Birdsong Study Looks Into Whether Music Is Uniquely Human
2012-12-31 09:16:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many birds use song to communicate everything from threats to mating intentions, but are these vocalizations considered music? Emory University neuroscientist Sarah Earp, also a classically trained viola player, decided to tackle this question, along with her colleague Donna Maney, by comparing neural responses of birds while they listened to male bird songs. “We found that the same neural reward system is activated in female...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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