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Latest Bird vocalization Stories

2010-11-22 13:31:06

Stretched tube designed by harvard researchers mimics zebra finch songs For centuries, hunters have imitated their avian prey by whistling through their fingers or by carving wooden bird calls. Now a team of physicists at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has reproduced many of the characteristics of real bird song with a simple physical model made of a rubber tube. "We wanted to know if you [could] build a simple device, which has minimal control but reproduces some non-trivial...

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2010-11-09 08:50:00

By Katrina Voss, Penn State University A team of scientists has observed the activity of nerve cells in a songbird's brain as it is singing a particular song. Dezhe Jin, an assistant professor in the Department of Physics at Penn State University and one of the study's authors, explained that understanding how birds string together sets of syllables "” or notes in a song "” may provide some insight into how the human brain learns language and produces speech. The research will be...

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2010-06-30 07:31:25

Wide range of pitch is due to vocal muscles more than air pressure Female zebra finches don't sing but make one-note, low-pitch calls. Males sing over a wide range of frequencies. University of Utah scientists discovered how: The males' stronger vocal muscles, not the pressure of air flowing through their lungs, lets them sing from the B note above middle C all the way to a whistle beyond the high end of a piano keyboard. "You have two variables "“ air pressure and muscle activity...

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2010-01-06 10:33:04

Scientists who compare insect chirps with ape calls may look like they are mixing aphids and orangutans, but researchers have found common denominators in the calls of hundreds of species of insects, birds, fish, frogs, lizards and mammals that can be predicted with simple mathematical models. Compiling data from nearly 500 species, scientists with the University of Florida and Oklahoma State University have found the calls of crickets, whales and a host of other creatures are ultimately...

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2009-10-21 08:19:31

It may take a village to raise a child, and apparently it takes at least two adult birds to teach a young song sparrow how and what to sing. In the first study conducted in the field to examine how juvenile song birds learn their repertoire, University of Washington researchers have learned that eavesdropping on the singing conversations between two adult sparrows appears to be a key event in song learning. The results are being published Oct. 21 in the online edition of the Proceedings of...

2009-08-26 09:10:44

Skylarks can hear the difference between friendly neighbours and dangerous strangers, and deal with any threatening intruders, says new research by scientists at Queen Mary, University of London.Male skylarks learn to recognise local dialects in their neighbours' individual songs, remember where each neighbour is supposed to be and reprimand intruders who don't belong in the neighbourhood, according to a study carried out by Dr. Elodie Briefer, a postdoctoral researcher at Queen Mary's School...

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2009-04-30 14:45:44

Two recently published studies show that some birds, parrots in particular, can "dance" to a musical beat. The reports, published online on April 30th in Current Biology, reveal that birds can also bob their heads, tap their feet, and sway their bodies along to a musical beat. Researchers said the findings show that a very basic aspect of the human response to music is shared with other species. "We've discovered a cockatoo [named Snowball] that dances to the beat of human music," said...

2009-01-12 08:47:31

Songbirds such as swamp sparrows appear to sing sophisticated, hard-to-produce songs in hostile situations, a U.S. university researcher said. When challenged, male swamp sparrows escalate their vocal performance by increasing the frequency range and speed of their songs, a study by University of Miami biology graduate student Adrienne DuBois said. The findings add to researchers' understanding of how birds use signals to communicate, DuBois and her colleagues said. Vocal performance was...

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2009-01-09 12:20:00

Birdsongs are used extensively as models for animal signaling and human speech, offering a glimpse of how our own communicating abilities developed. A new study by Adrienne DuBois, a graduate student at the University of Miami (UM) College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biology, shows that the Swamp Sparrow has the ability to emit songs that are physically difficult to produce during hostile situations, implying that songbirds use sophisticated vocal performances as signals in aggressive...

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2008-12-20 15:05:00

To many people, bird song can herald the coming of spring, reveal what kind of bird is perched nearby or be merely an unwelcome early morning intrusion. But to Sandra Vehrencamp, Cornell professor of neurobiology and behavior, bird song is a code from which to glean insights into avian behavior. Birds use song systems to communicate about mating and reproduction, territorial boundaries, age and even overall health. Vehrencamp studies them to decode which elements convey such essential...


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blee
  • Color; hue; complexion.
This word is Middle English in origin.
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