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Latest Bird Stories

Aurornis Xui Discovery Puts Archaeopteryx Back In Bird Family
2013-05-29 15:30:43

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new discovery made by paleontologists digging in China has put Archaeopteryx back on the map as one of the earliest birds. Archaeopteryx was first discovered in 1861 and, at the time, was professed to be the world's earliest bird. However, in 2011 researchers carried out a phylogenetic analysis and determined that the Archaeopteryx was actually just another feathered dinosaur. If this team was right, it would mean flight...

2013-05-29 09:42:27

Diseases can rapidly evolve to become more -- or less -- virulent, according to songbird study A novel disease in songbirds has rapidly evolved to become more harmful to its host on at least two separate occasions in just two decades, according to a new study. The research provides a real-life model to help understand how diseases that threaten humans can be expected to change in virulence as they emerge. "Everybody who's had the flu has probably wondered at some point, 'Why do I feel...

Bumblebee Buzz Scares Birds Out Of Nest
2013-05-29 08:57:01

Rebekah Eliason for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Bumblebees like to make their nests in holes insulated with plant materials. Freshly built bird nests can provide the perfect homes for bees, and they frequently invade newly made bird nests and take them over as their own. But how does a tiny bumblebee scare away a bird many times its size, and how does it choose which nest to invade? Piotr Jablonski and his colleagues from the Laboratory of Behavioral Ecology and Evolution at...

New Study Says Male And Female Dinosaurs Incubated Eggs
2013-05-16 09:59:11

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research into the incubation behavior of modern birds is shedding new light on the type of parental care carried out by their extinct ancestors. Geoff Birchard from the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University, along with Charles Deeming and Marcello Ruta from the University of Lincoln's School of Life Sciences, wanted to test the theory that data from modern birds could be used to predict the...

Changing Eating Habits Of The Hawaiian Petrel And Other Sea Birds Concern Scientists
2013-05-14 08:29:00

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Changes in the eating habits of endangered Hawaiian petrels have scientists concerned about the impact that the growth of industrialized fishing will have not only on the seabirds but upon other species of animals as well. Researchers from Michigan State University (MSU) and the Smithsonian Institution (SI) looked at both ancient and modern remains of the birds, which spent much of their lives foraging for food in the Pacific...

2013-05-07 23:32:06

“Birds of Paradise: Amazing Avian Evolution,” a traveling exhibition from the National Geographic Society, makes its national debut at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City, Mich. from June 16 to Sept. 22. Traverse City, MI (PRWEB) May 07, 2013 “Birds of Paradise: Amazing Avian Evolution,” a traveling exhibition from the National Geographic Society, will make its national debut this summer at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City, Mich. In 2004, National...

More Feathers Means More Eggs When It Comes To Sparrows
2013-05-07 20:16:17

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology An international team lead by the University of Granada has found that female sparrows will invest more energy into laying eggs according to the male's ability to fill the nest with feathers which serve to insulate the chicks from the cold and keep them alive. Scientists from the University of Granada, in collaboration with the South African University of the Witwatersrand and the Percy FitzPatrick Institute at the University of Cape...

2013-05-02 12:12:11

Birds that can't identify high quality male songs change male, female flock-mate behavior Female cowbirds incapable of recognizing high-quality male songs can alter the behavior of flock-mates of either sex and disrupt overall social structure, according to research published May 1 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Maguire and colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania. Individual traits can impact a social network even in cowbirds, but the impact of changing individual...

New Fossil Helps Explain Evolution Of Hummingbird Flight
2013-05-01 13:38:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a recently published study in“¯Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a small bird fossil found in Wyoming could be the link that connects the evolutionary dots between hummingbirds and swifts. Because the fossil had unusually well-preserved feathers, the scientists said they were able to create an approximate reconstruction that would not have been possible with fossilized bones alone. "This fossil bird...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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